oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Neural correlates of social decision-making in severely antisocial adolescents
Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Center for Adaptive Rationality (ARC), Max-Planck-Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany; Leiden University, Department of Psychology, Leiden, the Netherlands.
Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands .
Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Leiden University, Department of Psychology, Leiden, the Netherlands.
Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Leiden University, Department of Psychology, Leiden, the Netherlands.
Show others and affiliations
2014 (English)In: Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, ISSN 1749-5024, Vol. 9, no 12, 2059-2066 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neurobiological and behavioral findings suggest that the development of delinquent behavior is associated with atypical social-affective processing. However, to date, no study has examined neural processes associated with social interactions in severely antisocial adolescents. In this study we investigated the behavioral and neural processes underlying social interactions of juvenile delinquents and a matched control group. Participants played the mini-Ultimatum Game as a responder while in the MRI scanner. Participants rejected unfair offers significantly less when the other player had 'no alternative' compared with a 'fair' alternative, suggesting that they took the intentions of the other player into account. However, this effect was reduced in the juvenile delinquents. The neuroimaging results revealed that juvenile delinquents showed less activation in the temporal parietal junction (TPJ) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). However, the groups showed similar activation levels in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the right anterior insula (AI) when norms were violated. These results indicate that juvenile delinquents with severe antisocial behavior process norm violations adequately, but may have difficulties with attending spontaneously to relevant features of the social context during interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 9, no 12, 2059-2066 p.
Keyword [en]
IFG; TPJ; delinquents; fMRI; fairness; ultimatum game
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44149DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsu003ISI: 000350105900024PubMedID: 24493845OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44149DiVA: diva2:801187
Note

Funding Agencies:

Rubicon grant for Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)

VIDI grant for the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)

Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Colins, Olivier F.
In the same journal
Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 66 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf