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Psychopathic personality development from ages 9 to 18: genes and environment
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, United States. (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, United States.
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States.
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2016 (English)In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 27-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The genetic and environmental etiology of individual differences was examined in initial level and change in psychopathic personality from ages 9 to 18 years. A piecewise growth curve model, in which the first change score (G(1)) influenced all ages (9-10, 11-13, 14-15, and 16-18 years) and the second change score (G(2)) only influenced ages 14-15 and 16-18 years, fit the data better did than the standard single slope model, suggesting a turning point from childhood to adolescence. The results indicated that variations in levels and both change scores were mainly due to genetic (A) and nonshared environmental (E) influences (i.e., AE structure for G(0), G(1), and G(2)). No sex differences were found except on the mean values of level and change scores. Based on caregiver ratings, about 81% of variance in G(0), 89% of variance in G(1), and 94% of variance in G(2) were explained by genetic factors, whereas for youth self-reports, these three proportions were 94%, 71%, and 66%, respectively. The larger contribution of genetic variance and covariance in caregiver ratings than in youth self-reports may suggest that caregivers considered the changes in their children to be more similar as compared to how the children viewed themselves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Vol. 28, no 1, p. 27-44
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44229DOI: 10.1017/S0954579415000267ISI: 000375013300003PubMedID: 25990131Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84954391357OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44229DiVA, id: diva2:803441
Note

Funding Agencies:

NIMH R01 MH58354

NIMH Independent Scientist Award K02 MH01114-08

Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-04-13 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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