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Adjustment trajectories for youths involved in mutual hostility at home
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. (Center for Developmental Research)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2294-2256
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. (Center for Developmental Research)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7546-2275
2014 (English)Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Previous theoretical and empirical findings suggested that coercive behaviors in the family tend to be stable over time, and lead to adolescents’ poor social adjustment at school (see Patterson, 1986).  Existing research offers partial and indirect evidence on the generalizability of mutual hostility from home to other settings, and how this generalizability is linked to youths’ adjustment patterns over time. In a previous study (Trifan & Stattin, in press), we showed the existence of naturally occurring configurations of youths who both expose others and are exposed by others to aggression in three different environments: home, school, and free time. We showed that youths involved in mutual hostility at one time-point tend to be the same ones involved in mutual hostility one year later, across environments. The youths involved in mutual hostility had higher levels of impulsivity, delinquency, anger dysregulation, depression, and lower self-esteem compared to youths not involved in any hostility. The question is whether youths involved in mutual hostility have a different development of these adjustment features over time compared to youths with no mutual hostility. We focused on youths involved in mutual hostility at home. We used a longitudinal design, following 7th grade adolescents from a mid-town in Sweden annually over three years (N = 1289, 621 males and 668 females, Mage = 13.85, SD = 0.75). Using a latent growth modeling (LGM) method (Duncan, Duncan, & Strycker, 2013), we tested whether being involved in mutual hostility at home at Time 1 influenced the changes in impulsivity, delinquency, depression, anger dysregulation and self-esteem over three years of the study. In all our analyses we controlled for gender. In the first step, we tested whether the youths’ features changed over time, and then included exposure to the mutual hostility as the predictor of the change processes. First, results showed that youths involved in mutual hostility at home indeed started with higher initial levels of impulsivity, delinquency, and anger dysregulation compared to youths not involved in any hostility. At the same time, they had lower initial levels of self-esteem and higher levels of depression. Results also showed that being involved in mutually hostile interactions at home at Time 1 was associated with higher increases over time in impulsivity, delinquency and dysregulation, and with higher decreases in self-esteem. Thus, being involved in mutual hostility at home is linked to an over time pattern of both poor psychological and behavioral adjustment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
Keyword [en]
mutual hostility, youths' adjustment, family relationship, externalizing, internalizing
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44233OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44233DiVA: diva2:803822
Conference
14th Biennial Meeting of the European Association for Research on Adolescence, Cesme, Turkey, September 3-6, 2014
Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-04-13 Last updated: 2015-04-16Bibliographically approved

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Trifan, Tatiana AlinaStattin, Håkan
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