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Protective factors for youths’ involvement in and generalizability of mutual hostility across three contexts: home, school, and free-time
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Developmental Research)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2294-2256
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Developmental Research)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7546-2275
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Mutual hostility in a particular everyday context occurs when adolescents are hostile to others in this context and these others are also hostile to the adolescents. Previous studies showed that being involved in mutual hostility at home (coercive cycles, Patterson, 1986) or in school (bully-victims, Schwartz, 2000) was linked to youths’ poor social adjustment both at home and in school. Involvement in mutually hostile interactions across contexts has been understudied. In a previous study (Trifan & Stattin, in press), we examined youths who both exposed others and were exposed by others to aggression in three different environments: home, school, and free-time. We showed that youths involved in mutually hostile interactions at home were more likely to get involved in mutually hostile interactions with peers one year later. Moreover, youths involved in mutually hostile interactions in at least one context tended to start and to remain higher on impulsivity, delinquency, anger dysregulation, and depression, compared to other youths (Trifan & Stattin, in press). Given the negative consequences that involvement in mutual hostility has on youths’ adjustment, and the role of home in its generalization, the question is whether there are protective factors against youths’ involvement in mutually hostile interactions. The literature on youths’ adjustment places parental warmth and parental attachment as protective factors against a series of negative outcomes (see McKee et al., 2007; Rubin et al., 2004). In our study, we applied both a person oriented approach (Latent Profile Analysis (LPA), Lazarsfeld & Henry, 1968), and a variable oriented approach (cross-lagged models) to explore whether parental warmth and attachment reduce youths’ likelihood of involvement in mutual hostility across contexts.

We used all available 7th and 8th graders (N=2009, 51% males, Mage=14.06, SD=0.73) from a four-year cohort-sequential study conducted in a mid-size Swedish town, and followed them over one year. Using LPA, we tested whether parental warmth and parental attachment increased youths’ probability to belong to a low or no hostility, rather than to a mutual hostility group in each of the three contexts, at both time points. Results showed that having warm and safe-base parents increased youths’ likelihood for belonging to a low hostility group, rather than to a mutual hostility group (see Table 1). These findings were valid for all three contexts, and for both time points. Using a variable-oriented approach, we explored whether parental warmth and attachment attenuated the effect of being involved in mutual hostility at home on being involved in mutual hostility in other settings. Results showed that both parental warmth and attachment were linked to less involvement in mutual hostility at home one year later (see Table 2). However, taking into account the effect of warmth and attachment on involvement in mutual hostility did not reduce the effect of home mutual hostility on mutual hostility in peer contexts, nor did it moderate it. Overall, having a warm, supportive relationship with parents made youths less likely to belong to mutual hostility groups across contexts, but had little influence on the generalization of mutual hostility.    

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
Keywords [en]
mutual hostility, youths' adjustment, protective factors, parental warmth, parental attachment, contexts
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44235OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44235DiVA, id: diva2:803836
Conference
Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, March 19-21, 2015
Note

http://www.srcd.org/meetings/biennial-meeting/biennial-meeting-archives

Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-04-13 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Trifan, Tatiana AlinaStattin, Håkan

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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