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Risk for gastric cancer after antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing hip replacement
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3649-2639
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2000 (English)In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 60, no 22, 6376-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite strong evidence of an association between Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer, the benefit of eradicating H. pylori infection is unknown. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that exposure to high doses of antibiotics reduces risk for gastric cancer via possible eradication of H. pylori We conducted a nationwide case-control study nested in a cohort of 39,154 patients who underwent hip replacement surgery between 1965 and 1983. Such patients frequently receive prophylactic antibiotic treatment. During follow-up through 1989, we identified 189 incident cases of gastric cancer. For each case, three controls were selected from the cohort. Exposure data were abstracted from hospital records. Blood samples from a separate cohort undergoing hip replacement surgery were analyzed for anti-H. pylori IgG before and after surgery. Both long-term antibiotic treatment before surgery [odds ratio (OR), 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1-0.7] and prophylactic antibiotic treatment (OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5-1.1) conferred a reduction in gastric cancer risk. The reduction appeared stronger after 5 years (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-1.2) than during shorter follow-up after hip replacement (OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.4-1.7). There was an apparent decrease in risk with increasing body weight-adjusted doses of antibiotics (P = 0.13). However, the rate of H. pylori antibody disappearance was not strikingly higher in the cohort of patients undergoing hip replacement than in a control cohort. Our findings provide indirect support for the hypothesis that treatment with antibiotics at a relatively advanced age reduces the risk of gastric cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Birmingham, USA: American Asoociation for Cancer Research , 2000. Vol. 60, no 22, 6376-80 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Cancer and Oncology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44592ISI: 000165432600029PubMedID: 11103800Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0033708713OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44592DiVA: diva2:811686
Available from: 2015-05-12 Created: 2015-05-11 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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