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Can sulphonylurea addition to lifestyle changes help to delay diabetes development in subjects with impaired fasting glucose? The Nepi ANtidiabetes StudY (NANSY)
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Enheten för allmämedicin, Göteborg; Skaraborg Institute, Skövde.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Clinical Research Centre, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö; The NEPI Foundation, Malmö.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Clinical Research Centre, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö.
The NEPI Foundation, Malmö; Swedish National Competence Centre for Musculoskeletal Disorders, Department of Orthopædics, Lund University Hospital, Klinikgatan, Lund.
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2011 (English)In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 13, no 2, 185-8 p.Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Nepi ANtidiabetes StudY (NANSY) is a 5-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in Swedish primary care, examining whether the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and retinopathy (separately reported) would be delayed in 40- to 70-year-old subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) who, in addition to lifestyle changes, were treated with either placebo or low-dosage sulphonylurea (SU) (1-mg glimepiride; Amaryl). Of 274 subjects (163 men, 111 women), 138 were allocated to placebo (46.0% men, 56.8% women) and 136 to glimepiride (54.0% men, 43.2% women). The primary endpoint was conversion to diabetes. Average follow-up time was 3.71 years; 96 subjects converted to diabetes, 55 allocated to placebo and 41 to glimepiride (absolute difference 9.8%; p = 0.072). In conclusion, the study failed to support the notion that low-dose SU added to lifestyle changes in IFG subjects would help to delay the conversion to diabetes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malden,USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2011. Vol. 13, no 2, 185-8 p.
National Category
Clinical Medicine Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44836DOI: 10.1111/j.1463-1326.2010.01331.xISI: 000285753700010PubMedID: 21199271Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-78650662421OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44836DiVA: diva2:816526
Available from: 2015-06-03 Created: 2015-06-03 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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