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Feelings of safety in the presence of the police, security guards and police volunteers
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. (CAPS - center for Criminological And PsychoSocial research)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1576-5079
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. (CAPS - center for Criminological And PsychoSocial research)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0590-8600
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. (CAPS - center for Criminological And PsychoSocial research)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8163-6558
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. (CAPS - center for Criminological And PsychoSocial research)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3981-0353
2016 (English)In: European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research, ISSN 0928-1371, E-ISSN 1572-9869, Vol. 22, no 1, 19-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Uniformed presence is commonly thought to create feelings of safety in people.However, do differently uniformed people contribute to an equal amount of safety and arethere situation-dependent differences? The present study examined the association betweenvarious types of uniformed presence and people’s feelings of safety through a questionnaireamong 352 respondents (18–86 years) (49.1 % women). The questionnaire contained picturesof situations perceived as relatively safe and unsafe with or without uniformed presence. Therespondents estimated how safe they thought they would feel in these situations with nouniformed presence, two police officers, six police officers, a police vehicle, two securityguards, or two police volunteers. Results showed that uniformed presence did not increasefeelings of safety in a situation perceived as relatively safe, making patrol unnecessary. Insituations perceived as relatively unsafe however, all types of uniformed presence increasedfeelings of safety. Foot patrolling police contributed to the greatest increase in feelings ofsafety. Security guards and police volunteers created similar amounts of feelings of safetymaking police volunteers a cost-effective alternative. All types of foot patrol were better thanvehicle patrol, making non-police groups an alternative to vehicle patrol. Some situational,gender, and age differences were found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016. Vol. 22, no 1, 19-40 p.
Keyword [en]
Feelings of safety, Foot patrol, Police volunteers, Policing, Security guards, Vehicle patrol
National Category
Psychology Law and Society
Research subject
Psychology; Criminology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45469DOI: 10.1007/s10610-015-9282-xISI: 000376686300002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84961668086OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-45469DiVA: diva2:844444
Available from: 2015-08-06 Created: 2015-08-06 Last updated: 2016-06-17Bibliographically approved

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Doyle, MariaFrogner, LouiseAndershed, HenrikAndershed, Anna-Karin
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