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Work and health: working conditions, job requirements, individual habits, and sickness risk
Department of Economics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. (nationalekonomi)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4570-7504
Department of Economics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
2002 (English)In: The European Journal of Health Economics: Fourth European Conference on Health Economics: Book of Abstracts, 2002, Vol. 3 Suppl, p. 38-38Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The starting point and motivation of our study are the effects of working conditions, job requirements, and personal habits on people’s health. Our hypothesis is that these effects do exist, and that, on average, employees exposed to either less friendly working conditions, higher job demands, or characterized by bad individual habits, will have longer sickness spells than their cohort peers who do not have the previous characteristics. Another hypothesis is that employees who are working in a friendly work environment, executing jobs that do not demand high physical efforts, etc. will have a better health and will work longer hours than their cohort peers who do not have these characteristics. These hypotheses are tested using a longitudinal database provided by the Swedish National Social Insurance Board (RFV), which contains high quality information on the duration of the sickness spells, earnings, and demographics from both RFV’s and the social insurance offices administrative registers. Both nonparametric and parametric estimates show that the work environment and job tasks, as well as the individual habits have a significant effect on people’s health. Therefore, we conclude that it is desirable to have programs directed to improve the social and physical work environment, jobs tasks, and individual performance (through training and/or vocational rehabilitation of those individuals). Nevertheless, given that the magnitude of the effects of the individual habits was relatively higher than the work environment and job’s tasks effects, it is difficult to suggest which social policy might be suitable to improve employees health in general. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 3 Suppl, p. 38-38
Keywords [en]
Working conditions, job requirements, individual habits, and sickness risk
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45645OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-45645DiVA, id: diva2:848896
Conference
Fourth European Conference on Health Economics, Paris, France, July 7-10, 2002
Available from: 2015-08-26 Created: 2015-08-26 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Andrén, Daniela

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf