oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Myocardial infarction or mental disorders after cancer diagnosis and cancer-specific survival
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, China.
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3649-2639
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 61, 23-23 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Receiving a cancer diagnosis has been associated with immediate risks of mental disorders and cardiovascular disease which may reflect a severe stress-response to the diagnosis. We aimed to explore the association of myocardial infarction or mental disorders shortly after a cancer diagnosis and cancer-specific survival.

Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study based on the Swedish Cancer Register including 227,943 cancer patients diagnosed during 2004-2009. Non-fetal myocardial infarction (MI) and any mental disorders during the first 90 days after cancer diagnosis were identified by record linkage to the Patient Register. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval(CI) as an estimate of the association between MI or mental disorder and total cancer- and cancer-site specific survival.

Results: During the first 90 days post diagnosis, 724 patients experienced MI and 2,391 were diagnosed with mental disorders. During the average of 3.2 years of follow-up, the rate of any cancer specific-death was increased among patients who experienced MI (HR:1.46, 95%CI:1.27-1.68) with the highest mortality increments observed for lung cancer (HR:1.60, 95%CI:1.21-2.12) and blood cancers (HR:1.83, 95%CI:1.18-2.84). Similarly, patients diagnosed with mental disorder had higher total cancer-specific mortality rates (HR:1.25, 95%CI:1.15-1.37) with the highest mortality increments observed for breast cancer (HR:1.56, 95%CI:1.14-2.14), lung cancer (HR:1.34, 95%CI:1.10-1.63) and blood cancer (HR:1.61, 95%CI:1.21-2.15).

Conclusion: MI or mental disorder shortly after a cancer diagnosis may decrease cancer-specific survival, especially in breast-, lung-, and blood cancers (Funded by Swedish Cancer Society, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and others).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 61, 23-23 p.
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45879DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.07.453ISI: 000360250400069OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-45879DiVA: diva2:856062
Conference
45th Annual Meeting of the International-Society-of-Psychoneuroendocrinology (ISPNE) on Stress and the Brain - From Fertility to Senility, Edinburgh, Scotland, September 8-11, 2015
Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-21 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fall, Katja
By organisation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden
In the same journal
Psychoneuroendocrinology
Psychiatry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 255 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf