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Who gets caught at maturity gap?: a study of pseudomature, immature, and mature adolescents
University of Alberta, Department of Psychology, P-217 Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta, Canada.
University of Alberta, Department of Psychology, P-217 Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta, Canada.
University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6879-3022
2003 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 27, no 3, 253-263 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research examined links among adolescents’ maturity status, their biological, social, and psychological characteristics, and parents’ perceptions of their adolescents’ maturity. The participants were 430 Canadian adolescents in the sixth and ninth grades, and a subsample of their parents. Pattern-centred analyses confirmed the existence of three clusters of adolescents differing in maturity status: pseudomature (25%), immature (30%), and mature (44%). Further analyses found differences among the clusters in adolescents’ pubertal status, the social context (presence of older siblings and friends), and their desired age, involvement in pop culture, school and peer involvement, and close friendships. Analysis of mother and father reports revealed some differences in how parents of pseudomature, immature, and mature adolescents perceived their adolescents’ maturity, and in how they felt about their adolescents’ maturity. There were few grade differences in the findings. The results suggest that pseudomature adolescents, and to a smaller extent, immature adolescents, are caught in a maturity gap, which could have longer-term implications for their transition to adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 27, no 3, 253-263 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45739DOI: 10.1080/01650250244000326ISI: 000182678900007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0037687739OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-45739DiVA: diva2:856873
Note

Funding Agency:

Social Sciences and HumanitiesResearch Council of Canada

Available from: 2015-09-25 Created: 2015-09-08 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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