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Secreted gingipains from Porphyromonas gingivalis colonies exert potent immunomodulatory effects on human gingival fibroblasts
Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Microbiology Research, ISSN 0944-5013, E-ISSN 1618-0623, Vol. 178, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Periodontal pathogens, including Polphyromonas gingivalis, can form biofilms in dental pockets and cause inflammation, which is one of the underlying mechanisms involved in the development of periodontal disease, ultimately leading to tooth loss. Although P. gingivalis is protected in the biofilm, it can still cause damage and modulate inflammatory responses from the host, through secretion of microvesicles containing proteinases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of cysteine proteinases in P. gingivalis colony growth and development, and subsequent immunomodulatory effects on human gingival fibroblast. By comparing the wild type W50 with its gingipain deficient strains we show that cysteine proteinases are required by P. gingivalis to form morphologically normal colonies. The lysine-specific proteinase (Kgp), but not arginine-specific proteinases (Rgps), was associated with immunomodulation. P. gingivalis with Kgp affected the viability of gingival fibroblasts and modulated host inflammatory responses, including induction of TGF-beta 1 and suppression of CXCL8 and IL-6 accumulation. These results suggest that secreted products from P. gingivalis, including proteinases, are able to cause damage and significantly modulate the levels of inflammatory mediators, independent of a physical host-bacterial interaction. This study provides new insight of the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis and suggests gingipains as targets for diagnosis and treatment of periodontitis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 178, p. 18-26
Keywords [en]
Fibroblast, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Proteinase, Gingipain, Cytokine
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Research subject
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46081DOI: 10.1016/j.micres.2015.05.008ISI: 000361414400003PubMedID: 26302843Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84939779470OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46081DiVA, id: diva2:860590
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish Heart and Lung Association

Foundation of Olle Engkvist

Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Bengtsson, TorbjörnKhalaf, Hazem

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School of Medicine, Örebro University, SwedenSchool of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden
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