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Improved oxygenation during standing performance of deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure after cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 8, 748-752 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Breathing exercises after cardiac surgery are often performed in a sitting position. It is unknown whether oxygenation would be better in the standing position. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxygenation and subjecfive breathing ability during sitting vs standing performance of deep breathing exercises on the second day after cardiac surgery.

Methods: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (n=189) were randomized to sitting (controls) or standing. Both groups performed 3 x 10 deep breaths with a positive expiratory pressure device. Peripheral oxygen saturation was measured before, directly after, and 15 min after the intervention. Subjective breathing ability, blood pressure, heart rate, and pain were assessed.

Results: Oxygenation improved significantly in the standing group compared with controls directly after the breathing exercises (p <0.001) and after 15 min rest (p=0.027). The standing group reported better deep breathing ability compared with controls (p=0.004). A slightly increased heart rate was found in the standing group (p= 0.047).

Conclusion: After cardiac surgery, breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure, performed in a standing position, significantly improved oxygenation and subjective breathing ability compared with sitting performance. Performance of breathing exercises in the standing position is feasible and could be a valuable treatment for patients with postoperative hypoxaemia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 47, no 8, 748-752 p.
Keyword [en]
breathing exercises, cardiac surgery, oxygenation
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiotherapy
Research subject
Sports Science; Rehabilitation Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46173DOI: 10.2340/16501977-1992ISI: 000361420600012PubMedID: 26134462Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84940107563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46173DiVA: diva2:861836
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-1385
Note

Funding Agencies:

Department of Thoracic Surgery at Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden

Department of Physiotherapy at Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden

Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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