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Impact of administered bifidobacterium on murine host fatty acid composition
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), University College, Cork, Ireland. (Nutrition-Gut-Brain Interactions Research Centre)
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), University College, Cork, Ireland; Teagasc Moorepark Food Research Centre, Fermoy, Ireland.
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), University College, Cork, Ireland, Ireland.
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), University College, Cork, Ireland, Ireland.
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2010 (English)In: Lipids, ISSN 0024-4201, E-ISSN 1558-9307, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 429-436Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently, we reported that administration of Bifidobacteria resulted in increased concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in murine adipose tissue [1]. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of co-administration of Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702258 and the substrate for EPA, alpha-linolenic acid, on host fatty acid composition. alpha-Linolenic acid-supplemented diets (1%, wt/wt) were fed to mice (n = 8), with or without B. breve NCIMB 702258 (daily dose of 10(9) microorganisms) for 8 weeks. Two further groups received either supplement of B. breve alone or unsupplemented diet. Tissue fatty acid composition was assessed by gas liquid chromatography. Dietary supplementation of alpha-linolenic acid resulted in higher (P < 0.05) alpha-linolenic acid and EPA concentrations in liver and adipose tissue and lower (P < 0.05) arachidonic acid in liver, adipose tissue and brain compared with mice that did not receive alpha-linolenic acid. Supplementation with B. breve NCIMB 702258 in combination with alpha-linolenic acid resulted in elevated (P < 0.05) liver EPA concentrations compared with alpha-linolenic acid supplementation alone. Furthermore, the former group had higher (P < 0.05) DHA in brain compared with the latter group. These results suggest a role for interactions between fatty acids and commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. This interaction between administered microbes and fatty acids could result in a highly effective nutritional approach to the therapy of a variety of inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg, Germany: Springer, 2010. Vol. 45, no 5, p. 429-436
Keywords [en]
Omega-3 fatty acids, Eicosapentaenoic acid, Docosahexaenoic acid, Bifidobacteria, Microbiota, Probiotics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46367DOI: 10.1007/s11745-010-3410-7ISI: 000277373500007PubMedID: 20405232Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77953230061OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46367DiVA, id: diva2:866258
Available from: 2015-11-02 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2018-09-16Bibliographically approved

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Wall, Rebecca

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