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Health implications of high dietary omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, County Cork, Ireland; Teagasc Food Research Centre, Biosciences Department, Moorepark, Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland.
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, County Cork, Ireland; Teagasc Food Research Centre, Biosciences Department, Moorepark, Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland. (Nutrition-Gut-Brain Interactions Research Centre)
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, County Cork, Ireland; Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, County Cork, Ireland.
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, County Cork, Ireland; Teagasc Food Research Centre, Biosciences Department, Moorepark, Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland.
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 2090-0724, E-ISSN 2090-0732, Vol. 2012, 539426Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (e.g., arachidonic acid (AA)) and omega-3 (n-3) PUFA (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)) are precursors to potent lipid mediator signalling molecules, termed "eicosanoids," which have important roles in the regulation of inflammation. In general, eicosanoids derived from n-6 PUFA are proinflammatory while eicosanoids derived from n-3 PUFA are anti-inflammatory. Dietary changes over the past few decades in the intake of n-6 and n-3 PUFA show striking increases in the (n-6) to (n-3) ratio (~15 : 1), which are associated with greater metabolism of the n-6 PUFA compared with n-3 PUFA. Coinciding with this increase in the ratio of (n-6) : (n-3) PUFA are increases in chronic inflammatory diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cardiovascular disease, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). By increasing the ratio of (n-3) : (n-6) PUFA in the Western diet, reductions may be achieved in the incidence of these chronic inflammatory diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2012. Vol. 2012, 539426
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46361DOI: 10.1155/2012/539426PubMedID: 22570770Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84871246684OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46361DiVA: diva2:866263
Available from: 2015-11-02 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2015-11-04Bibliographically approved

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