oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) for gastrointestinal surgery, part 1: pathophysiological considerations
Royal Surrey County Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom.
Department of Anesthesia, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal QC, Canada.
Royal Infirmary Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine Campus Charite, Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum Charite, University Medicine, Berlin, Germany.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 59, no 10, p. 1212-1231Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The present article has been written to convey concepts of anaesthetic care within the context of an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) programme, thus aligning the practice of anaesthesia with the care delivered by the surgical team before, during and after surgery.

Methods: The physiological principles supporting the implementation of the ERAS programmes in patients undergoing major abdominal procedures are reviewed using an updated literature search and discussed by a multidisciplinary group composed of anaesthesiologists and surgeons with the aim to improve perioperative care.

Results: The pathophysiology of some key perioperative elements disturbing the homoeostatic mechanisms such as insulin resistance, ileus and pain is here discussed.

Conclusions: Evidence-based strategies aimed at controlling the disruption of homoeostasis need to be evaluated in the context of ERAS programmes. Anaesthesiologists could, therefore, play a crucial role in facilitating the recovery process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015. Vol. 59, no 10, p. 1212-1231
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Research subject
Anaesthesiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46392DOI: 10.1111/aas.12601ISI: 000362589100002PubMedID: 26346577Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84943348247OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46392DiVA, id: diva2:867016
Available from: 2015-11-04 Created: 2015-11-04 Last updated: 2018-09-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Ljungqvist, Olle

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ljungqvist, Olle
By organisation
School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden
In the same journal
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 469 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf