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Dietary exposure assessment of pregnant women to bisphenol-A from cans and microwave containers in Southern Spain
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0529-379X
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2009 (English)In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 47, no 2, 506-510 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bisphenol-A (BPA), material for polycarbonate and epoxy resin synthesis, has been detected in canned food, among other food containers. In mammal studies, BPA transferred from mother to fetus, caused abnormality of reproductive organs, and advanced female puberty. BPA from canned food and microwave containers was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Population was cohort of mother-son pairs established at Granada University Hospital. Frequency of food consumption (including canned food) was studied with a semi-quantitative questionnaire. The most frequently consumed products were fish and juice cans, consumed 1-3 times/week by 34.7% and 22.3% of the study population, respectively. The women made little use of polymer microwave containers, 52.8% never using them and 45.9% using them <3 times/month. Estimated mean (standard deviation) intake of BPA was 1.1(0.839) microgram/day. No relationship was found between BPA exposure and maternal socio-demographic variables or newborn characteristics. This study offers the first estimate of BPA dietary intake by pregnant women in Southern Spain. The consumption of canned foods and drinks by these women means that their exposure was lower than EFSA estimates for the European population. Nevertheless it remains of concern, given the proven undesirable effects of low-level exposure and higher susceptibility of pregnant women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2009. Vol. 47, no 2, 506-510 p.
Keyword [en]
BPA; Pregnancy; Can; Microwave containers
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46707DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2008.12.011ISI: 000263429800036PubMedID: 19121362Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-58149502817OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46707DiVA: diva2:873117
Note

Funding Agencies:

Junta de Andalucia AGR141

European Union Commission QLK4-1999-01422  FOOD-CT-2003-506319

Available from: 2015-11-23 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2015-11-25Bibliographically approved

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