oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Extreme events and climate change: The post-disasters dynamics of forest fires and forest storms in Sweden
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. (Miljösociologiska sektionen)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6735-0011
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. (Miljösociologiska sektionen)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6522-6025
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 31, no 2, 148-155 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How are extreme events understood in the forest sector? What are the implications of forest professionals’ understandings and evaluations of extreme events? These questions are central to this study, which analyses the handling of the largest forest storm and the largest forest fire in modern Swedish history. The theoretical approach is that of risk governance in practice, which stresses that understanding the framings, practices and strategies used by members of professional organizations is pivotal for how disasters are managed. Two interview studies have been conducted with forest professionals involved in the two cases. The analysis shows that there were fundamentally different understandings of the two events and their implications for forestry practice. The storm was seen as an unavoidable natural disaster, but the consequences of future storms were considered possible to mitigate through changed forest practices. The forest fire, on the other hand, was conceptualized as a partly natural and partly man-made disaster, and forestry was seen as having very limited possibilities to reduce the likelihood as well as the consequences of similar events. The different understandings had significant implications for the post-disasterdynamics and for which management practices that were developed. Thus, understanding howextreme events are perceived is crucial to understanding which management practices thatemerge in their wake, a topic of growing relevance because climate change is predicted toincrease the frequency of forest fires and storms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016. Vol. 31, no 2, 148-155 p.
Keyword [en]
Forest fires, forest storms, climate change, forest consultants, risk perceptions, risk governance
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Forest Science
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46772DOI: 10.1080/02827581.2015.1113308ISI: 000368547300003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84955728555OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46772DiVA: diva2:873727
Projects
Future Forests
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchSwedish Research Council Formas
Note

Funding Agencies:

Forestry Research Institute of Sweden (Skogforsk)

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU)

Umeå University

Available from: 2015-11-24 Created: 2015-11-24 Last updated: 2016-02-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1275 kB)126 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1275 kBChecksum SHA-512
a786699a25025b67f6192d97e8629f3e68dad86808fc195ab67efbb4472dee6160dbf4eebeb788af4b29fc99c56c5e258b7d8f48593627eb84c63e16e67525a7
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lidskog, RolfSjödin, Daniel
By organisation
School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)Forest Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 126 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 399 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf