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Cultural Capital and Music in the UK and Sweden: Exploring Class and Gender Inequalities
Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art, Örebro University, Sweden. (Aestethics, Culture and Media)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9067-9496
2015 (English)In: Societies in transition: Progression or regression? : BSA Annual Conference 2015, Durham: British Sociological Association , 2015Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As Prieur and Savage (2011) observe, Bourdieu's notion of cultural capital does not entail a timeless, fixed set of social relations. For example, some have pointed out that there are strong gender, rather than class, divides in 'highbrow' taste in Sweden (Bihagen and Katz-Gerro 2000) whereas in the UK, participation rather than consumption may often be a better indicator of social inequality (Bennett et al. 2008). How certain types of participation accrue symbolic value cross-culturally and temporally can therefore help illuminate differing forms of structural inequalities. Music has often been one of the most distinguishing measures in terms of class (Bennett et al. 2008: 46). Nevertheless a Bourdieusian approach to music tends to reduce its role entirely to its social function (Frith 2002: 251); neglects questions of aesthetics (Born 2010; Prior 2011), affect (Hennion 2007) and listening; and often fails to explore how inequalities can be subverted. Focusing on reproduction is important however we need to outline how groups renegotiate and contest symbolic violence also. This paper foregrounds the first stages of postdoctoral research project looking at inequalities in music practices in the UK and Sweden. Using a 3 stage mixed-methods research design, it aims to outline different types of 'public' and 'private' participation and provide a detailed picture of how music attachments (Hennion 2010) and practices relate to gender and class. Through highlighting the similarities as well as the differences between the two countries, this will help to expand on and extend the insights of cultural capital theory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Durham: British Sociological Association , 2015.
Keyword [en]
Bourdieu, class, music, gender, cultural capital
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Musicology; Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46979ISBN: 9780904569445 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46979DiVA: diva2:877471
Conference
British Sociological Association Annual Conference 2015, Societies in Transition: Progression or Regression? Glasgow, UK, April 15-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2015-12-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf