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What messages do patients remember?: The relationship between patient perception of physical therapist’s messages, patient characteristics, satisfaction and outcome
Physiotherapy Department, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Center for Health and Medical Psychology, Örebro University, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. Center for Health and Medical Psychology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. (CHAMP)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9429-9012
2016 (English)In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 96, no 3, 275-283 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Based on a behavioral medicine perspective, modern recommendations for physical therapists treating patients with spinal pain include performing a trustworthy physical examination, conveying the message that back pain is benign, and stressing that activity is a key to recovery. However, little evidence is available on how patients perceive these biopsychosocial messages and how patients' perceptions of these messages relate to their recovery.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between perceptions of treatment delivery that are related to an evidence-based approach and psychological factors, treatment outcome, and treatment satisfaction.

Design: A cohort study with 3 measurement points was conducted.

Methods: Data on 281 participants were collected.

Results: High catastrophizing and lower mood in the participants were correlated to "not perceiving the biopsychosocial message" measured at 6 weeks after treatment start. Participants who did not perceive the biopsychosocial message were at higher risk for disability and had lower treatment satisfaction 6 months after treatment start even when controlling for pretreatment pain intensity. "Not perceiving the biopsychosocial message" was not a mediator for treatment outcome and treatment satisfaction. Physical therapists' treatment orientations or attitudes were not related to the perception of the message by the patients.

Limitations: There was no measure of actual practice behavior.

Conclusions: Maladaptive cognitions and negative emotions appear to affect the way information provided during treatment is perceived by patients. The way information is perceived by patients influences treatment outcome and treatment satisfaction. Physical therapists are advised to check that patients with higher levels of catastrophizing and lower mood are correctly perceiving and interpreting a biopsychosocial message.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physical Therapy Association , 2016. Vol. 96, no 3, 275-283 p.
National Category
Applied Psychology Orthopedics
Research subject
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46988DOI: 10.2522/ptj.20140557ISI: 000371452200003PubMedID: 26183588Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84960155936OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-46988DiVA: diva2:877590
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare

Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2016-04-04Bibliographically approved

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School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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