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Elevated levels of perfluoroalkyl acids in family members of occupationally exposed workers: the importance of dust transfer
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5729-1908
Jianghan University, Wuhan, China.
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2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 9313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

The exposure pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) to humans are still not clear because of the complex living environment, and few studies have simultaneously investigated the bioaccumulative behaviour of different PFAAs in humans. In this study, serum, dust, duplicate diet, and other matrices were collected around a manufacturing plant in China, and homologous series of PFAAs were analysed. PFAA levels in dust and serum of local residents in this area were considerably higher than those in non-polluted area. Although dietary intake was the major exposure pathway in the present study, dust ingestion played an important role in this case. Serum PFAAs in local residents was significantly correlated with dust PFAAs levels in their living or working microenvironment. Serum PFAAs and dust PFAAs were significantly higher in family members of occupational workers (FM) than in ordinary residents (OR) (p<0.01). After a careful analysis of the PFAAs exposure pathway, a potential pathway in addition to direct dust ingestion was suggested: PFAAs might transferred from occupational worker's clothes to dinners via cooking processes. The bioaccumulative potential of PFHxS and PFOS were higher than other PFAAs, which suggested a substantial difference between the bioaccumulative ability of perfluorinated sulfonic acids and perfluorinated carboxylic acids.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2015. Vol. 5, article id 9313
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Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47498DOI: 10.1038/srep09313ISI: 000351289100002PubMedID: 25791573Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84925357588OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-47498DiVA, id: diva2:895351
Note

Funding Agencies:

Chinese Academy of Sciences KZCX2-YW-BR-25  YSW2013B01

Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences  XDB14030500

National Natural Science Foundation 21107128  21222702  21277164  21477154

Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved

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