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Methylation of inorganic mercury by methylcobalamin in aquatic systems
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5729-1908
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center of Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
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2007 (English)In: Applied organometallic chemistry, ISSN 0268-2605, E-ISSN 1099-0739, Vol. 21, no 6, 462-467 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Text
Abstract [en]

The methylation of inorganic Hg(II) by methylcobalamin in aquatic systems was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-digestion cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-UV-CV AFS). Monomethylmercury (MMC) could be positively identified as the reaction product in the aqueous solution. The salinity and pH of the aquatic system have great effects on the formation of MMC, because they could change the species of the reactants in the solution. From an electrophile reaction point of view, salinity and pH alter the electron density of the methyl donor and the electrophilicity of metal ion in the reaction system. This methylation of inorganic Hg(II) is shown to be possible even in highly saline solutions, which indicates its importance in aquatic environments. Kinetic experiments showed that the methylation reaction was fast and first-order for Hg(II). The first-order reaction rate was determined to be 0.00612 and 0.000287 min-1 for pH 5.0 and 1.5, respectively. It is suggested that this methylation could occur in the absence of enzymes, in which Hg(II) acts as an electrophile to attack methylcobalamin with a subsequent transfer of carbanion methyl group to the higher oxidized state of Hg(II).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2007. Vol. 21, no 6, 462-467 p.
Keyword [en]
methylation; inorganic mercury; methylmercury; methylcobalamin; pH; salinity; electrophile reaction
National Category
Environmental Sciences Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science; Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47584DOI: 10.1002/aoc.1221ISI: 000247299300011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-34250616318OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-47584DiVA: diva2:895445
Conference
7th International Conference on Environmental and Biological Aspects of Main-Group Organometals (ICEBAMO), Heraklion, Greece, October 10-12, 2006
Available from: 2016-01-19 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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