oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
PCDD/PCDF, chlorinated pesticides and PAH in Chinese teas
Ecological Chemistry and Geochemistry, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1496-9245
Institute for Natural Resources and Waste Management, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon, China.
Institute for Natural Resources and Waste Management, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon, China.
2002 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 46, no 9-10, 1429-1433 p., PII S0045-6535(01)00264-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

Four samples of Chinese tea (two green teas, and two brick teas) were analyzed for their concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF), chlorinated pesticides and PAH. The infusions prepared from these teas were also analyzed for PCDD/PCDF. The levels of DDT and its metabolites in tea leaves were within the safety limit of 0.2 mg/kg. Rather high levels of total PAH were obtained in brick tea (1048-1162 mg/kg), when compared with green tea (497-517 mg/kg). In terms of PCDD/PCDF, the concentrations of green tea and brick tea differed by a factor of 16, while the concentrations of all infusions were within a factor of 2. The dioxin concentrations in green tea leaves can be explained through uptake of atmospheric PCDD/PCDF. The higher concentrations in the brick tea leaves are due the longer exposure time, and to certain extent, the use of old leaves, branches and roots when making the tea, and additional components such as soil particulates through contamination. Certain Chinese populations drinking a large amount of brick tea (>31 per day) indicated that individuals of these populations consume more tea than Europeans or North Americans result in a comparably higher intake of PCDD/PCDF. Tea consumption can attribute to up to 10% of the TDI recommended by WHO (only PCDD/PCDF considered, no PCB analyzed).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2002. Vol. 46, no 9-10, 1429-1433 p., PII S0045-6535(01)00264-8
Keyword [en]
polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins; polychlorinated dibenzofurans; Chinese teas; tolerable daily intake; chlorinated pesticides; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Enviromental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47633DOI: 10.1016/S0045-6535(01)00264-8ISI: 000175042800026PubMedID: 12002472Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0035995262OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-47633DiVA: diva2:901273
Conference
20th Symposium on Halogenated Organic Pollutants and Pops - Dioxin 2000, Monterey, California, USA, August 13-17, 2000
Available from: 2016-02-07 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fiedler, Heidelore
In the same journal
Chemosphere
Chemical SciencesEnvironmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 243 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf