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Emissions of PCDD and PCDF from combustion of forest fuels and sugarcane: A comparison between field measurements and simulations in a laboratory burn facility
National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, University of Queensland, Coopersplains, Australia.
CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale Vic, Australia.
ARCADIS Geraghty and Miller, Inc, Research Triangle Park NC, USA.
Office of Research and Development, NRMRL (E343-04), US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park NC, USA.
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2011 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 83, no 10, p. 1331-1338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Text
Abstract [en]

Release of PCDD and PCDF from biomass combustion such as forest and agricultural crop fires has been nominated as an important source for these chemicals despite minimal characterisation. Available emission factors that have been experimentally determined in laboratory and field experiments vary by several orders of magnitude from <0.51 mu g TEQ(t fuel consumed)(-1) to >1001 mu g TEQ(t fuel consumed)(-1). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of experimental methods on the emission factor.

A portable field sampler was used to measure PCDD/PCDF emissions from forest fires and the same fuel when burnt over a brick hearth to eliminate potential soil effects. A laboratory burn facility was used to sample emissions from the same fuels. There was very good agreement in emission factors to air (EF(Air)) for forest fuel (Duke Forest, NC) of 0.52 (range: 0.40-0.79), 0.59 (range: 0.18-1.2) and 0.75 (range: 0.27-1.2) mu g TEQ(WHO2005) (t fuel consumed)(-1) for the in-field, over a brick hearth, and burn facility experiments, respectively. Similarly, experiments with sugarcane showed very good agreement with EFAir of 1.1 (range: 0.40-2.2), 1.5 (range: 0.84-2.2) and 1.7 (range: 0.34-4.4) mu g TEQ (t fuel consumed)(-1) for in-field, over a brick hearth, open field and burn facility experiments respectively. Field sampling and laboratory simulations were in good agreement, and no significant changes in emissions of PCDD/PCDF could be attributed to fuel storage and transport to laboratory test facilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011. Vol. 83, no 10, p. 1331-1338
Keywords [en]
Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-clioxins; Polychlorinated dibenzofurans; Persistent organic pollutants; Bushfires; Forest fires; Sugarcane burning
National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Enviromental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47622DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.03.062ISI: 000291187600006PubMedID: 21524778Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79955592313OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-47622DiVA, id: diva2:901282
Note

Funding Agency:

Secretariat of the Stockholm Convention

Available from: 2016-02-07 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved

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Fiedler, Heidelore

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