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The feminine style, the male influence, and the paradox of gendered political blogspace
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Political Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7291-2875
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Political Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5485-8577
2016 (English)In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 19, no 11, 1636-1652 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores gender differences in politic al communication among blogging politicians. The article sets out to explore two ba seline questions: (1) Are distinct gendered ‘blogstyles’ to be found among political representa tives? and (2) How do gender and gendered blogstyles interplay and affect the impact of political blogs? The empirical study draws on a survey targeting blogging politicians in Sweden (N=523). The analysis identifies substantial differences in how female and male poli ticians communicate in the blogosphere as well as the outcomes in terms of feedback and impac t. Female politicians, to a greater degree than their male counterparts, utilize blogging for the purpose of fostering a stronger connection with their readers as well as to enquire about ideas and policy perspectives. This strategy seems to be successful for fostering quali tative feedback from readers yet female bloggers have far less impact than their male colle ges. We discuss two potential understandings of these results; relating to gender stereotypes and the network power structure of the blogosphere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016. Vol. 19, no 11, 1636-1652 p.
Keyword [en]
Gender; politics; social media; e-democracy; blogs; blogging
National Category
Political Science Sociology Gender Studies
Research subject
Political Science; Sociology; Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48117DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2016.1154088ISI: 000378924100009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84961199429OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-48117DiVA: diva2:901451
Available from: 2016-02-08 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf