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Validation of the Greek cypriot translation of the triarchic psychopathy measure
Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Curium-Leiden University Medical Center, Oegstgeest, The Netherlands.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Personality Assessment, ISSN 0022-3891, E-ISSN 1532-7752, Vol. 98, no 2, 146-154 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Text
Abstract [en]

Psychopathy is conceived of as a pathological constellation of personality traits, manifested in aberrant behavioral, interpersonal, and emotional tendencies. This study examined within a Greek-speaking nonclinical sample (N = 419) associations between differing phenotypic dimensions of psychopathy (boldness, meanness, disinhibition) assessed via the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (TriPM) and self-report criterion measures of psychopathology, personality, and history of abuse and neglect. Consistent with predictions of the triarchic model of psychopathy, evidence was found for distinct correlates of the 3 phenotypic dimensions. Boldness was associated with both adaptive (immunity to anxiety/distress, fearlessness, low hostility) and maladaptive tendencies (grandiose manipulative traits, Machiavellian features including desire for control/status, and verbal aggression). Meanness was related to callous and unemotional traits, features of Machiavellianism (e.g., amoral manipulation and distrust of others), physical aggression, and absence of positive parenting. Disinhibition, by contrast, was characterized by anxiety and distress, exposure to violence, and retrospective accounts of abuse history, along with impulsive, irresponsible, and hostile tendencies. These findings indicate that the Greek-Cypriot translation of the TriPM effectively assesses the constructs of the triarchic model and extend what we know about their empirical correlates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016. Vol. 98, no 2, 146-154 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48934DOI: 10.1080/00223891.2015.1077452ISI: 000369856800004PubMedID: 26431272Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84956817763OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-48934DiVA: diva2:909550
Available from: 2016-03-07 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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