oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Child Witnesses to Intimate Partner Violence: Their Descriptions of Talking to People About the Violence
Department of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4700-1452
2016 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Witnessing intimate partner violence (IPV) may have damaging effects on children’s well-being and development. How children understand IPV affects the risk of their developing negative outcomes. Talking with children about the violent episodes they have experienced can change their beliefs regarding their parents’ IPV, and therefore may also be a way to help them deal with these adverse experiences. The purpose of the current study was to use the children’s narratives to explore the relationship between how IPV was perceived by the children and their experience of talking about it. Interviews with 31 children between 9 and 13 years of age were analyzed using a thematic method. Two main groups of children were identified: children who described the violence as a horrifying experience and children who preferred not to think about the violence. The findings showed that children who described the violence as a horrifying experience perceived talking about the violence as a positive, yet sometimes distressing, experience that made a real difference in their lives; whereas, children who preferred not to think about the violence did not see much need to talk about it and benefit from talking about it. The study confirms previous research indicating that talking about IPV experiences sometimes leads to feelings of relief in children. Thereby, professionals play an important role by providing an appropriate setting to help children reduce their distressing feelings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks, USA: Sage Publications, 2016.
Keyword [en]
Children, intimate partner violence, talking, social support, thematic analysis
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49435DOI: 10.1177/0886260516639256PubMedID: 26993038OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-49435DiVA: diva2:913046
Available from: 2016-03-18 Created: 2016-03-18 Last updated: 2017-03-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Izaguirre, AinhoaCater, Åsa
By organisation
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden
In the same journal
Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Social Work

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 274 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf