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Respiratory muscle strength is not decreased in patients undergoing cardiac surgery
Department of Neuroscience: Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Neuroscience: Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Medical Sciences: Clinical Physiology, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Medical Sciences: Clinical Physiology, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden; UFC, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, ISSN 1749-8090, E-ISSN 1749-8090, Vol. 11, 41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Postoperative pulmonary impairments are significant complications after cardiac surgery. Decreased respiratory muscle strength could be one reason for impaired lung function in the postoperative period. The primary aim of this study was to describe respiratory muscle strength before and two months after cardiac surgery. A secondary aim was to describe possible associations between respiratory muscle strength and lung function.

Methods: In this prospective observational study 36 adult cardiac surgery patients (67 ± 10 years) were studied. Respiratory muscle strength and lung function were measured before and two months after surgery.

Results: Pre- and postoperative respiratory muscle strength was in accordance with predicted values; MIP was 78 ± 24 cmH2O preoperatively and 73 ± 22 cmH2O at two months follow-up (p = 0.19). MEP was 122 ± 33 cmH2O preoperatively and 115 ± 38 cmH2O at two months follow-up (p = 0.18). Preoperative lung function was in accordance with predicted values, but was significantly decreased postoperatively. At two-months follow-up there was a moderate correlation between MIP and FEV1 (r = 0.43, p = 0.009).

Conclusions: Respiratory muscle strength was not impaired, either before or two months after cardiac surgery. The reason for postoperative lung function alteration is not yet known. Interventions aimed at restore an optimal postoperative lung function should focus on other interventions then respiratory muscle strength training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: BioMed Central, 2016. Vol. 11, 41
Keyword [en]
Cardiac surgery, lung function, median sternotomy, respiratory muscle strength
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Cardiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49632DOI: 10.1186/s13019-016-0433-zISI: 000374540500001PubMedID: 27036318OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-49632DiVA: diva2:918965
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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