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Does celiac disease influence survival in sepsis?: A nationwide longitudinal study
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Pediatrics, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
Department of Infectious Diseases, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden; Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1024-5602
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, e0154663Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Individuals with celiac disease (CD) are at increased risk of sepsis. The aim of this study was to examine whether CD influences survival in sepsis of bacterial origin.

Methods: Nationwide longitudinal registry-based study. Through data on small intestinal biopsies from Sweden's 28 pathology departments, we identified 29,096 individuals with CD (villous atrophy, Marsh stage III). Each individual with CD was matched with five population-based controls. Among these, 5,470 had a record of sepsis according to the Swedish Patient Register (1,432 celiac individuals and 4,038 controls). Finally we retrieved data on mortality in sepsis patients through the Swedish Cause of Death Registry.

Results: CD was associated with a 19% increase in overall mortality after sepsis (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09-1.29), with the highest relative risk occurring in children (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.62; 95%CI = 0.67-3.91). However, aHR for death from sepsis was lower (aHR = 1.10) and failed to reach statistical significance (95%CI = 0.72-1.69). CD did not influence survival within 28 days after sepsis (aHR = 0.98; 95%CI = 0.80-1.19).

Conclusions: Although individuals with CD seem to be at an increased risk of overall death after sepsis, that excess risk does not differ from the general excess mortality previously seen in celiac patients in Sweden. CD as such does not seem to influence short-term or sepsis-specific survival in individuals with sepsis and therefore is not an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in sepsis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco, USA: Public Library of Science , 2016. Vol. 11, no 4, e0154663
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50105DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0154663ISI: 000375211700121PubMedID: 27124735Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84964859397OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-50105DiVA: diva2:925804
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agency:

Kalmar County Council

Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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