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Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a preliminary randomized controlled trial
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Northern Stockholm Psychiatry, VUB/KogNUS, St Göran Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3587-6075
2014 (English)In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 18, no 6, 672-683 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6-8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions. No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed. The dropout rate was lower with cognitive behavioural therapy than with recreational activity, and participants in cognitive behavioural therapy rated themselves as more generally improved, as well as more improved regarding expression of needs and understanding of difficulties. Both interventions appear to be promising treatment options for adults with autism spectrum disorder. The interventions' similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2014. Vol. 18, no 6, 672-683 p.
Keyword [en]
Adult, Asperger disorder, autism, cognitive behaviour therapy, group, randomized controlled trial
National Category
Clinical Medicine Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50138DOI: 10.1177/1362361313493681ISI: 000342637900006PubMedID: 24089423Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84904644640OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-50138DiVA: diva2:925915
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2016-05-24Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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