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Minor physical anomalies in adults with autism spectrum disorder and healthy controls
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Järva Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic, Spånga, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Orebro University Hospital.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6726-7787
Orebro University Hospital. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3587-6075
2014 (English)In: Autism Research and Treatment, ISSN 2090-1925, E-ISSN 2090-1933, 743482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Minor Physical Anomalies (MPAs) are subtle abnormalities of the head, face, and limbs, without significant cosmetic or functional impact to the individual. They are assumed to represent external markers of developmental deviations during foetal life. MPAs have been suggested to indicate severity in mental illness and constitute external markers for atypical brain development. Higher frequencies of MPAs can be found in children with autism. The aims of the present study were to examine the prevalence and patterns of MPAs in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and to investigate whether MPAs are associated with symptom severity and overall functioning. Fifty adults with ASD and intelligence within the normal range and 53 healthy controls were examined with the Waldrop scale, an instrument for assessing MPAs. Face and feet were photographed enabling blinded assessment. Significant differences between the ASD and the control group were found on the MPA total scores, and also in the craniofacial region scores. Moreover, the shape of the ears was associated with autistic traits, in the ASD group. High MPA total scores were associated with poorer functioning. The findings suggest a link between MPAs, autistic traits, and level of functioning. Assessment of MPAs may assist in the diagnostic procedure of psychiatric disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2014. 743482
National Category
Clinical Medicine Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50132DOI: 10.1155/2014/743482PubMedID: 24782925OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-50132DiVA: diva2:925918
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-03-21Bibliographically approved

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Humble, Mats B.Bejerot, Susanne
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CiteExportLink to record
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