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Intensive group cognitive therapy and individual cognitive therapy for social phobia: sustained improvement at 5-year follow-up
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Kings College London, UK; University of Oxford, UK.
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3587-6075
2011 (English)In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 25, no 8, 994-1000 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about the long-term outcome of treatments for social phobia. At 5 years post-treatment we contacted the 67 patients who had been treated with intensive group cognitive therapy (IGCT) or individual cognitive therapy (ICT) in a randomized controlled trial (Mörtberg, Clark, Sundin, & Åberg Wistedt, 2007) that originally compared IGCT, ICT, and treatment as usual (n=100 for the full trial). Seventy-two percent (48 patients) who received IGCT or ICT agreed to participate in the follow-up assessment. All re-completed the original self-report measures of symptoms and disability and a quality of life measure. A subset was also interviewed. Seventy-five percent (36 patients) had sought no further treatment for social phobia. Comparisons between post-treatment and 5-year follow-up indicated that patients who had received either treatment showed further improvement in social phobia symptoms and disability during the follow-up period. These improvements were present in patients who had no additional treatment, as well as in the total sample. In conclusion, it appears that the effects of IGCT and ICT are maintained and improved upon at 5 years post-treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford, United Kingdom: Elsevier, 2011. Vol. 25, no 8, 994-1000 p.
Keyword [en]
Cognitive behavior therapy, individual and group treatment, long-term follow-up, social phobia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50147DOI: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2011.06.007ISI: 000296394400002PubMedID: 21763101Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-80054697369OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-50147DiVA: diva2:925935
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2016-05-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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