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Low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) among psychiatric out-patients in Sweden: relations with season, age, ethnic origin and psychiatric diagnosis
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, St. Göran, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6726-7787
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Clinical Chemistry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, St. Göran, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3587-6075
2010 (English)In: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ISSN 0960-0760, E-ISSN 1879-1220, Vol. 121, no 1-2, 467-470 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a chart review at a psychiatric out-patient department, latitude 59.3 degrees N, a sample of patients with tests of serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25-OHD) and plasma intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) was collected, together with demographic data and psychiatric diagnoses. During 19 months, 117 patients were included. Their median 25-OHD was 45 nmol/l; considerably lower than published reports on Swedish healthy populations. Only 14.5% had recommended levels (over 75). In 56.4%, 25-OHD was under 50 nmol/l, which is related to several unfavourable health outcomes. Seasonal variation of 25-OHD was blunted. Patients with ADHD had unexpectedly low iPTH levels. Middle East, South-East Asian or African ethnic origin, being a young male and having a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder or schizophrenia predicted low 25-OHD levels. Hence, the diagnoses that have been hypothetically linked to developmental (prenatal) vitamin D deficiency, schizophrenia and autism, had the lowest 25-OHD levels in this adult sample, supporting the notion that vitamin D deficiency may not only be a predisposing developmental factor but also relate to the adult patients' psychiatric state. This is further supported by the considerable psychiatric improvement that coincided with vitamin D treatment in some of the patients whose deficiency was treated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford, United Kingdom: Elsevier, 2010. Vol. 121, no 1-2, 467-470 p.
Keyword [en]
Vitamin D, calcidiol, parathyroid hormone, blood levels, out-patients, chart review, autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depressive disorder, ADHD, ethnic groups, immigrants
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50159DOI: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2010.03.013ISI: 000280600200105PubMedID: 20214992Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77954356484OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-50159DiVA: diva2:925942
Conference
14th Workshop on Vitamin D, Burgge, Belgium, Oct. 04-08, 2009
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Humble, Mats B.Bejerot, Susanne
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