oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Do autistic traits play a role in the bullying of obsessive-compulsive disorder and social phobia sufferers?
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section Psychiatry St. Göran, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3587-6075
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section Psychiatry St. Göran, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
2009 (English)In: Psychopathology, ISSN 0254-4962, E-ISSN 1423-033X, Vol. 42, no 3, 170-176 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Social phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) share several similarities: both are categorized as anxiety disorders, avoidant personality disorder and depression are common in both, they have a similar age of onset and course, and both disorders respond to treatments with serotonin reuptake inhibitors and cognitive behavioural therapy. However, OCD and social phobia differ in respect to their relation to autism spectrum disorders (ASD; i.e. Asperger's syndrome, autism, pervasive disorder not otherwise specified). Findings that suggest a link between OCD and ASD have no parallel in social phobia. Moreover, obsessive-compulsive, paranoid and schizotypal personality disorders are prevalent in OCD and in ASD, but not in social phobia. Individuals with ASD are known to be frequent targets of bullying. We hypothesised that individuals with autistic traits would have been frequent targets for bullies during their childhood, as opposed to people without such traits.

Methods: Adult patients with social phobia (n = 63) or OCD (n = 65) were assessed regarding autistic traits, and interviewed about being bullied at school. A reference group (n = 551) responded to questions about being bullied.

Results: There was a significant difference in the prevalence of being bullied between OCD (50%), social phobia patients (20%) and the reference group (27%). Autistic traits were more common in OCD than in social phobia. A history of being bullied was related to autistic traits among patients.

Conclusions: Falling victim to bullying is not a random event. Autistic traits, i.e. low social skills, may be a predictor of being bullied in school. The high rate of bullying victims in persons who later develop OCD is suggested to be related to the overlap between OCD and ASD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: S. Karger, 2009. Vol. 42, no 3, 170-176 p.
Keyword [en]
Asperger's syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bullying, social phobia, autistic disorder, obsessive-compulsive spectrum
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50166DOI: 10.1159/000207459ISI: 000265417400005PubMedID: 19276643Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-61749102102OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-50166DiVA: diva2:925946
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bejerot, Susanne
In the same journal
Psychopathology
Medical and Health SciencesPsychiatry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 226 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf