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Low prevalence of smoking among patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder
Department of Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Uppsala, USA; Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Family Medicine, Division of Psychiatry, Huddinge University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3587-6075
Department of Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Uppsala, USA; Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Family Medicine, Division of Psychiatry, Huddinge University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6726-7787
1999 (English)In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 40, no 4, 268-272 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tobacco smoking is common among psychiatric patients, especially among those with schizophrenia, where the prevalence is extremely high, 74% to 88%, compared with 45% to 70% in patients with other psychiatric diagnoses. Patients with anxiety disorders are less well investigated in this respect, particularly obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. Eighty-three psychiatric outpatients with OCD and 110 members of the Swedish OCD Association responded to questions concerning their smoking habits. Among OCD patients, 14% were current smokers (compared with 25% in the general population of Sweden), 72% had never smoked, and 11 previous smokers had stopped, mostly without any difficulties. Since a decreased smoking rate among OCD subjects was confirmed, the smoking prevalences in schizophrenia and OCD, respectively, seem to represent either end of a continuum, and OCD may also differ significantly from other anxiety disorders in this respect. Possible implications of this finding for the purported frontal lobe dysregulation in OCD are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, USA: Saunders Elsevier, 1999. Vol. 40, no 4, 268-272 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50186DOI: 10.1016/S0010-440X(99)90126-8ISI: 000081425800004PubMedID: 10428185Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0032985645OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-50186DiVA: diva2:925977
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2016-05-24Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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