oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sleep and academic performance in later adolescence: results from a large population-based study
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health AS, Bergen, Norway.
Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley CA, USA.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5359-0452
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health AS, Bergen, Norway; Domain for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway; Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 318-324Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the current study was to assess the association between sleep duration and sleep patterns and academic performance in 16-19 year-old adolescents using registry-based academic grades. A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland-survey, surveyed 7798 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53.5% girls). The survey was linked with objective outcome data on school performance. Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep deficit and bedtime differences between weekday and weekend. School performance [grade point average (GPA)] was obtained from official administrative registries. Most sleep parameters were associated with increased risk for poor school performance. After adjusting for sociodemographic information, short sleep duration and sleep deficit were the sleep measures with the highest odds of poor GPA (lowest quartile). Weekday bedtime was associated significantly with GPA, with adolescents going to bed between 22:00 and 23:00 hours having the best GPA. Also, delayed sleep schedule during weekends was associated with poor academic performance. The associations were somewhat reduced after additional adjustment for non-attendance at school, but remained significant in the fully adjusted models. In conclusion, the demonstrated relationship between sleep problems and poor academic performance suggests that careful assessment of sleep is warranted when adolescents are underperforming at school. Future studies are needed on the association between impaired sleep in adolescence and later functioning in adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2016. Vol. 25, no 3, p. 318-324
Keywords [en]
Sleep duration, GPA, epidemiology, school
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50597DOI: 10.1111/jsr.12373ISI: 000383451800009PubMedID: 26825591Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84971612742OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-50597DiVA, id: diva2:934212
Note

Funding Agencies:

Uni Research Health

Norwegian Directorate for Health and Social Affairs

Available from: 2016-06-08 Created: 2016-06-08 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Linton, Steven J.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Linton, Steven J.
By organisation
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work
In the same journal
Journal of Sleep Research
Neurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 380 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf