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Observational and mechanistic links between C-reactive protein and blood pressure in elderly women
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9831-0896
2016 (English)In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 89, 52-57 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is hypothesized that chronic systemic inflammation contributes to the age-related decline in cardiovascular function. The aim of the present study was to combine an assessment of the relationship between the serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in 108 elderly women (65 and 70 years) with an in-vitro exploration of the effects of CRP on the proliferative and angiogenic potential of endothelial cells exposed to serum in elderly women. Based on the median CRP level in our population, LowCRP (CRP<1.3mg/L) and HighCRP (>1.3mg/L) groups were identified. Body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were significantly higher in the HighCRP group than in the LowCRP group (p<0.05). The influence of CRP on SBP and DBP remained significant after adjustments for BMI and use of antihypertensive medication (p<0.05). When adjusting for waist circumference the observed influence of CRP on SPB was attenuated (p=0.062). We next evaluated the ability to form capillary tubes (angiogenesis assay) and the proliferation rate of endothelial cells exposed to the sera of elderly women. Increased serum CRP levels were associated with an increased doubling time of endothelial cells (R(2)=0.39; p<0.05) and decreased capillary tube length (R(2)=0.30; p<0.05), indicating a reduction in the proliferation rate of endothelial cells and angiogenic potential. In conclusion, chronic inflammation influences blood pressure in elderly women and compromises endothelial cell function, thus contributing to the age-related decline in vascular health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Clare, Ireland: Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 89, 52-57 p.
Keyword [en]
Aging, angiogenesis, CRP, endothelial cell, hypertension, inflammation
National Category
Geriatrics Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Geriatrics; Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51134DOI: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.04.016ISI: 000376829600010PubMedID: 27180160Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84964649115OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-51134DiVA: diva2:945519
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish National Centre for Research P2012/0102  P2014-0117

Available from: 2016-07-01 Created: 2016-07-01 Last updated: 2016-08-02Bibliographically approved

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