oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Safety hazards in abdominal surgery related to communication between surgical and anesthesia unit personnel found in a Swedish nationwide survey
Department of Intensive Care and Perioperative Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund.
Department of Intensive Care and Perioperative Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2636-4745
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Patient Safety in Surgery, ISSN 1754-9493, E-ISSN 1754-9493, Vol. 10, 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

Background: Many adverse events occur due to poor communication between surgical and anesthesia unit personnel. The aim of this study was to identify strategies to reduce risks unveiled by a national survey on patient safety.

Methods: During 2011-2015, specially trained survey teams visited the surgery departments at Swedish hospitals and documented routines concerning safety in abdominal surgery. The reports from the first seventeen visits were reviewed by an independent group in order to extract findings related to routines in communication between anesthesia and surgical unit personnel.

Results: In general, routines regarding preoperative risk assessment were safe and well-coordinated. On the other hand, routines regarding medication prior to surgery, reporting between the different units, and systems for reporting and providing feedback on adverse events were poor or missing. Strategies with highest priority include: 1. a uniform national health declaration form; 2. consistent use of admission notes; 3. systems for documenting all important medical information, that is accessible to everyone; 4. a multidisciplinary forum for the evaluation of high-risk patients; 5. weekly and daily scheduling of surgical programs; 6. application of the WHO check list; 7. open dialog during surgery; 8. reporting based on SBAR; 9. oral and written reports from the surgeon to the postoperative unit; and 10. combined mortality and morbidity conferences.

Conclusion: One repeatedly occurring hazard endangering patient safety was related to communication between surgical and anesthesia unit personnel. Strategies to reduce this hazard are suggested, but further research is required to test their effectiveness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: BioMed Central, 2016. Vol. 10, 2
National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51400DOI: 10.1186/s13037-015-0089-yISI: 000378151900001PubMedID: 26766965OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-51400DiVA: diva2:950114
Available from: 2016-07-27 Created: 2016-07-19 Last updated: 2017-02-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ljungqvist, Olle
By organisation
School of Medical Sciences
In the same journal
Patient Safety in Surgery
Surgery

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 159 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf