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Perfluorooctanesulfonate and related fluorochemicals in the Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) from China
Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong; Environmental Measurement Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6800-5658
Environmental Measurement Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
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2008 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 42, no 19, p. 7078-7083Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are used in a variety of industrial applications. We tested the hypothesis that, in Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), captivity in industrialized areas increases PFC levels, potentially presenting a health risk to these animals. Serum samples were collected from 100 tigers from industrialized or nonindustrialized regions in China with nonpoint sources of PFCs. Mean concentrations of PFCs in these samples ranged from 1.57 ± 0.83 ng/mL in nonindustrial Hailin to 4.31 ± 2.90 ng/mL in industrial Beijing. PFC concentrations were significantly higher in tigers from the industrial city of Harbin than those from Hailin (p < 0.05). Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was the most abundant PFC in all tigers and increased with age, regardless of industrial/nonindustrial background (p < 0.01). However, PFOS concentrations were 2-4 orders of magnitude less than the current no-observed-effect level. In addition, overall PFC levels in Amur tigers were low compared with various species living in other countries, consistent with the relatively short history of PFC use in China. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that captivity in industrialized areas increases PFC levels in Amurtigers. They also suggestthat PFC accumulation will persist, and even increase, with continued use of PFCs in China.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2008. Vol. 42, no 19, p. 7078-7083
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49999DOI: 10.1021/es801453dISI: 000259603700012PubMedID: 18939529Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-54749153283OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-49999DiVA, id: diva2:950404
Note

Funding Agency:

National Natural Science Foundation of China 20677060  20777074

Available from: 2016-07-29 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved

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Yeung, Leo W. Y.Lam, Paul K. S.Dai, Jiayin

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