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Accumulation of perfluorinated compounds in captive Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) and African lions (Panthera leo Linnaeus) in China
Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, HK SAR, China; National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6800-5658
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, HK SAR, China.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2134-3710
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2008 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 73, no 10, p. 1649-1653Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

The accumulation of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in the sera of captive wildlife species Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) and African lions (Panthera leo Linnaeus) from Harbin Wildlife Park, Heilongjiang Province, in China were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was the predominant contaminant with a mean serum concentration of 1.18 ng mL-1 in tigers and 2.69 ng mL-1 in lions. Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) was the second most prevalent contaminant in both species. The composition profiles of the tested PFCs differed between tigers and lions, and the percentages of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were greater in lions than in tigers, indicating different exposures and/or metabolic capabilities between the two species. Assessments of the risk of PFC contamination to the two species were obtained by comparing measured concentrations to points of departure or toxicity reference values (TRVs). Results suggest no risk of PFOS exposure or toxicity for the two species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2008. Vol. 73, no 10, p. 1649-1653
Keywords [en]
Composition profiles; PFNA; PFOA; PFOS
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49996DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2008.07.079ISI: 000261561600011PubMedID: 18789477Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-54549085376OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-49996DiVA, id: diva2:950407
Note

Funding Agency:

National Natural Science Foundation of China 20677060  20777074

Available from: 2016-07-29 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved

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Yeung, Leo Wai YinLam, Paul K. S.Dai, Jiayin

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