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Perfluorinated Compounds in Tap Water from China and Several Other Countries
Centre for Coastal Pollution and Conservation, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
Centre for Coastal Pollution and Conservation, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong; National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6800-5658
National Research Center for Geoanalysis, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, 26 Bai Wan Zhuang Avenue, Xicheng District, Beijing, China.
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2009 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 43, no 13, 4824-4829 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

The recent development of a sensitive and accurate analytical method for the analysis of 20 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), including several short-chain PFCs, has enabled their quantification in tap water collected in China, Japan, India, the United States, and Canada between 2006 and 2008. Of the PFCs measured, PFOS, PFHxS, PFBS, PFPrS, PFEtS, PFOSA, N-EtFOSAA, PFDoDA, PFUnDA, PFDA, PFNA, PFHpA, PFHxA, PFPeA, PFBA, and PFPrA were found at detectable concentrations in the tap water samples. The water samples from Shanghai (China) contained the greatest concentrations of total PFCs (arithmetic mean = 130 ng/L), whereas those from Toyama (Japan) contained only 0.62 ng/L. In addition to PFOS and PFOA, short-chain PFCs such as PFHxS, PFBS, PFHxA, and PFBA were found to be prevalent in drinking water. According to the health-based values (HBVs) and advisory guidelines derived for PFOS, PFOA, PFBA, PFHxS, PFBS, PFHxA, and PFPeA by the U.S.EPA and the Minnesota Department of Health, tap water may not pose an immediate health risk to consumers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2009. Vol. 43, no 13, 4824-4829 p.
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49988DOI: 10.1021/es900637aISI: 000267435500033PubMedID: 19673271Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-67649946809OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-49988DiVA: diva2:950414
Available from: 2016-07-29 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2016-08-03Bibliographically approved

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