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Perfluoroalkyl Substances in the Blood of Wild Rats and Mice from 47 Prefectures in Japan: Use of Samples from Nationwide Specimen Bank
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki, Japan.
Department of Natural Sciences, Savannah State University, Savannah, GA, United States.
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki, Japan.
Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6800-5658
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2013 (English)In: Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, ISSN 0090-4341, E-ISSN 1432-0703, Vol. 65, no 1, 149-170 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Numerous studies have reported on the global distribution, persistence, fate, and toxicity of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). However, studies on PFASs in terrestrial mammals are scarce. Rats can be good sentinels of human exposure to toxicants because of their habitat, which is in close proximity to humans. Furthermore, exposure data measured for rats can be directly applied for risk assessment because many toxicological studies use rodent models. In this study, a nationwide survey of PFASs in the blood of wild rats as well as surface water samples collected from rats' habitats from 47 prefectures in Japan was conducted. In addition to known PFASs, combustion ion chromatography technique was used for analysis of total fluorine concentrations in the blood of rats. In total, 216 blood samples representing three species of wild rats (house rat, Norway rats, and field mice) were analyzed for 23 PFASs. Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS; concentration range <0.05-148 ng/mL), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA; <0.1-157), perfluorododecanoate (<0.05-5.8), perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnDA; <0.05-51), perfluorodecanoate (PFDA; <0.05-9.7), perfluorononanoate (PFNA; <0.05-249), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) (<0.05-60) were detected >80 % of the blood samples. Concentrations of several PFASs in rat blood were similar to those reported for humans. PFSAs (mainly PFOS) accounted for 45 % of total PFASs, whereas perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs), especially PFUnDA and PFNA, accounted for 20 and 10 % of total PFASs, respectively. In water samples, PFCAs were the predominant compounds with PFOA and PFNA found in >90 % of the samples. There were strong correlations (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05) between human population density and levels of PFOS, PFNA, PFOA, and PFOSA in wild rat blood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013. Vol. 65, no 1, 149-170 p.
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49966DOI: 10.1007/s00244-013-9878-4ISI: 000321785100015PubMedID: 23494483Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84879320309OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-49966DiVA: diva2:950438
Available from: 2016-07-29 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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