oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Climate risks and forest practices: Forest owners' acceptance of advice concerning climate change
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9274-3634
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6735-0011
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 31, no 6, 618-625 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on qualitative interviews with Swedish forest owners this study focuses on climate change, risk management and forest governance from the perspective of the forest owners. The Swedish forest governance system has undergone extensive deregulation, with the result that social norms and knowledge dissemination are seen by the state as important means of influencing forest owners' understandings and practices. Drawing on Foucault's concept of governmentality this study contributes knowledge on how forest owners understand and manage climate-related risk and their acceptance of advice. From the interview study, three main conclusions can be drawn: (1) forest owners' considerations largely concern ordinary forestry activities; (2) knowledge about forest management and climate adaptation combines experiences and ideas from various sources; and (3) risk awareness and knowledge of “best practices” are not enough to ensure change in forestry practices. The results of this study show that the forest owners have to be selective and negotiate about what knowledge to consider relevant and meaningful for their own forest practice. Accordingly, local forest management can be understood as situated in a web of multifarious interests, claims, concerns and knowledges, where climate change adaptation is but one of several aspects that forest owners have to consider.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2016. Vol. 31, no 6, 618-625 p.
Keyword [en]
Forestry, governmentality, advisory practices, risk, climate change, adaptation
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51706DOI: 10.1080/02827581.2015.1134648ISI: 000380544600009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84955095168OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-51706DiVA: diva2:953882
Available from: 2016-08-19 Created: 2016-08-19 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Uggla, YlvaLidskog, Rolf
By organisation
School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 161 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf