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Understanding the role of narratives in planning policy making: the case of Jerusalem
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Center for Government in Change. (Center for Urban and Regional Studies)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9599-7776
2016 (English)In: IPA 2016 Hull: Book of Abstracts, 2016, 38-39 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Jerusalem is one of the main components of the Israel-Palestine conflict and as such part of a narrative battle. There is no common and accepted truth about the history, the everyday life, the administration, or the future of the city. The identity politics of Jerusalem contains a number of narratives and one main characteristic is that they are based on so called commemorations that play a large role in the construction of Jerusalem. The commemorative narratives (Zerubavel, 1995) are used and produced in order to state a claim. This paper focuses on narratives regarding territory and more specifically how these narratives affect planning policy-making regarding a contested city, particularly inspired by Margaret Somers idea on public narratives (2000). These collective memories, closely incorporated in national identity, are created and reproduced in schools, in the military system, by politicians, by authors, by civil servants, etc., through acts of commemoration. Commemorative narratives could be connected to a larger framework – a so-called master commemorative narrative. This master narrative is a wider statement of the collective memory. Narratives are rarely undisputed. Where we find narratives we also find counter-narratives causing a narrative battle and in the case of Jerusalem, narratives have the capacity to ignite the conflict. It is therefore necessary to better understand the role of these narratives within a conflict and within policy processes. The aim of this paper is twofold; (1.) to distinguish the narratives of Jerusalem in political speeches, statements and similar, and (2.) to examine the role they play in city planning policies and processes. The paper is based on the analysis of a selection of texts within the time frame 1967-2015, as well as an extensive interview material from 2007 and 2009. In addition, a follow-up survey was performed in 2015.  

References

Somers, Margaret, R. (1994) “The narrative constitution of identity: A relational and network approach”. Theory and Society. Vol. 23:605-649.

Zerubavel, Yael (1995) Recovered roots. Collective Memory and the Making of Israeli National Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. 38-39 p.
Keyword [en]
narratives, identity, conflict, city planning
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalization Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51777OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-51777DiVA: diva2:954998
Conference
Interpretative Policy Analysis, 11th International Conference, Hull, UK, July 5-7, 2016
Note

Panel 8 (1): Narratives in Public Policy making

Available from: 2016-08-24 Created: 2016-08-24 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Kristianssen, Ann-Catrin
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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