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Social representation of "music" in young adults: A cross-cultural study
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore, Karnataka, India .
Centre for Speech Language Therapy and Hearing Science, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales, UK; Department of Hearing and Speech Science, Xinhua College, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. (Handikappvetenskap)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9184-6989
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 1, 24-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The present study was aimed to explore perceptions of and reactions to music in young adults (18-25 years) using the theory of social representations (TSR).

Design: The study used a cross-sectional survey design and included participants from India, Iran, Portugal, United States, and United Kingdom. Data were analyzed using various qualitative and quantitative methods.

Study sample: The study sample included 534 young adults.

Results: The Chi-square analysis showed significant differences between the countries regarding the informants’ perception of music. The most positive connotations about music were found in the responses obtained from Iranian participants (82.2%), followed by Portuguese participants (80.6%), while the most negative connotations about music were found in the responses obtained from Indian participants (18.2%), followed by Iranian participants (7.3%). The participants’ responses fell into 19 main categories based on their meaning; however, not all categories were found in all five countries. The co-occurrence analysis results generally indicate that the category “positive emotions or actions” was the most frequent category occurring in all five countries.

Conclusions: The results indicate that music is generally considered to bring positive emotions for people within these societies, although a small percentage of responses indicate some negative consequences of music.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxfordshire, United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis, 2017. Vol. 56, no 1, 24-32 p.
Keyword [en]
Music listening, hearing loss, public health hazard, attitude, social representation, text mining, cross-culture
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Disability Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51922DOI: 10.1080/14992027.2016.1227481ISI: 000390895000004PubMedID: 27609441Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84986211935OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-51922DiVA: diva2:956949
Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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