oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Formulation and stabilisation of the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala
Department of Microbiology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Microbiology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Microbiology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
2011 (English)In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0003-6072, E-ISSN 1572-9699, Vol. 99, no 1, 107-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The yeast Pichia anomala has antifungal activities and its potential in biocontrol and biopreservation has previously been demonstrated. To practically use an organism in such applications on a larger scale the microbe has to be formulated and stabilised. In this review we give an overview of our experience of formulating and stabilising P. anomala strain J121 in a wider perspective. The stabilisation techniques we have evaluated were liquid formulations, fluidised bed drying, lyophilisation (freeze-drying) and vacuum drying. With all methods tested it was possible to obtain yeast cells with shelf lives of at least a few months and in all cases the biocontrol activity was retained. Fluidised bed drying was dependent on the addition of cottonseed flour as a carrier during the drying process. In liquid formulations a sugar, preferentially trehalose, was a required additive. These two kinds of microbial stabilisation are easily performed and relatively inexpensive but in order to keep the cells viable the biomaterial has to be stored at cool temperatures. However, there is room for optimization, such as improving the growth conditions, or include preconditioning steps to enable the cells to produce more compatible solutes necessary to survive formulation, desiccation and storage. In contrast, lyophilisation and vacuum drying require a lot of energy and are thus expensive. On the other hand, the dried cells were mostly intact after one year of storage at 30A degrees C. Inevitably, the choice of formulation and stabilisation techniques will be dependent also on the intended use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer Netherlands, 2011. Vol. 99, no 1, 107-112 p.
Keyword [en]
Formulation, Freeze-drying, Fluidised bed drying, Vacuum drying, Biopreservation
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52206DOI: 10.1007/s10482-010-9522-5ISI: 000286463200013PubMedID: 20981571OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-52206DiVA: diva2:971049
Note

Funding Agency:

Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research-MISTRA, Sweden 

Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2016-09-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Schnürer, Johan
In the same journal
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology
Microbiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 133 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf