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Microbial biomass in relation to C and N mineralization during laboratory incubations
Department of Water in Environment and Society, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Water in Environment and Society, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
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1988 (English)In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 20, no 3, 281-286 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Net carbon and nitrogen mineralization rates were determined for an arable soil during 12 weeks at 37†C using an aerobic incubation-leaching technique. The amounts of mineralized C and N were compared to changes in the contents of C and N in microbial biomass (as determined by the chloroform fumigation incubation method; CFIM) during the incubation and to amounts of organic C and N in the leachates. Microorganisms were also followed by direct counting of bacteria, measurements of total hyphal lengths and fluorescein diacetate (FDA)-active hyphae, and by most probable number determinations of protozoa (naked amoebae and flagellates).

Numbers of naked amoebae increased nearly 10-fold initially and then decreased between weeks 6 and 12. Bacterial numbers and FDA-active hyphae decreased during the incubation, and the relative composition changed slightly in favour of bacteria. Total hyphal lengths remained almost constant.

A total of 105 μg N g'- soil dry wt and 1179 μg C g- soil dry wt was mineralized during the incubation, while the microbial N pool decreased by 42 γm- soil dry wt and the microbial C pool decreased by 225μ g- soil dry wt. Soluble organic matter in the leachates amounted to 16 and 31% of mineralized C and N, respectively.

The possibility of measuring C mineralization with less frequent teachings and determinations of N mineralization offers an easy method for assessing changes in labile soil organic matter over time or for comparisons between soils. Through the use of appropriate C-to-N ratios, the N-content in the labile pool can be calculated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 1988. Vol. 20, no 3, 281-286 p.
National Category
Soil Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52231DOI: 10.1016/0038-0717(88)90004-1ISI: A1988P241000003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0024222133OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-52231DiVA: diva2:971163
Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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