oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Mineralization of nitrogen from15N labelled fungi, soil microbial biomass and roots and its uptake by barley plants
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
1987 (English)In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 102, no 1, 71-78 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The availability of nitrogen in15N labelled fungi, soil microbial biomass (Ca(15NO3)2 immobilized by addition of glucose), barley roots and Ca(NO3)2 to barley plants was investigated in a greenhouse experiment. Samples of above-ground plant biomass were taken five times during 76 days. During this time, and at the start of the experiment, the C and N contents of the soil microbial biomass were determined. Microbial biomass-C decreased during the first 41 days, and then increased back to pre-treatment levels. Only 2% of the total soil15N was found in the microbial biomass two days after additions of Ca(15NO3)2. At the final sampling 76 days later, 17% of the15N remaining in soil was found in the microbial biomass. In the other tratments, microbial biomass-N accounted for 20% of remaining soil15N in the one that had received fungi, 29% in the one with barley roots and 35% in the Ca(NO3)2 plus glucose treatment. At harvest, 38% of the soil15N at day 0 added as Ca(NO3)2-N, 29% of fungal-N, 10% of N immobilized in the soil microbial biomass and 7% of N in barley roots was recovered in the above-ground plant biomass.

It can be concluded that nitrogen in the native soil biomass is resistant to mineralization and plant uptake. The use of laboratory grown organisms for mineralization studies will overestimate the plant availability of nitrogen in soil microorganisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1987. Vol. 102, no 1, 71-78 p.
Keyword [en]
barley; chloroform fumigation; fungi; 15N-nitrate; microbial biomass N; mineralization; roots
National Category
Soil Science Agricultural Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52233DOI: 10.1007/BF02370903ISI: A1987J629700012Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0009715820OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-52233DiVA: diva2:971168
Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Schnürer, Johan
In the same journal
Plant and Soil
Soil ScienceAgricultural Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 146 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf