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Exploring the mode of action of Pichia anomala - a postharvest biocontrol yeast
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Chemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
2001 (English)In: Yeast, ISSN 0749-503X, E-ISSN 1097-0061, Vol. 18, S212-S212 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The ascomycetous yeast Pichia anomala J121, inhibits mould growth in malfunctioning airtight storage systems for moist animal feed grain. Extensive studies of P. anomala J121 have given detailed knowledge of growth physiology and limiting environmental factors, which is necessary to understand the inhibitory activity. Our main objective is to identify the mechanisms behind the inhibitory activity. We have two non-exclusive working hypothesis: I)P. anomala produces antifungal substances and II)P. anomala out-competes the mould for space, nutrients, and oxygen. We have found that volatile metabolites restrict radial growth and sporulation of moulds in mouth-to-mouth assays where agar plates are placed facing each other with the yeast inoculated on the upper plate and the mould on the lower. Previous studies of P. anomala have shown that it produces high quantities of ethyl acetate - a mould-inhibitory substance. We are working to identify homologous genes in P. anomala J121 to the acetyltransferase encoding genes ATF1 and ATF2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Another approach has been to identify intra- and extracellular metabolites during aerobic and oxygen limited growth. Intracellular metabolites were identified by Magic Angle Spinning-High Resolution-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-HR- NMR) that allows analysis of living cells. Extracellular metabolites were analysed with HPLC. Glycerol, well known for its role during osmotic stress, is accumulated in response to oxygen stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2001. Vol. 18, S212-S212 p.
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-52305ISI: 000170442100363OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-52305DiVA: diva2:971845
Conference
XXth International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, Prague, Czech Republic, August 26-31, 2001
Available from: 2016-09-19 Created: 2016-09-16 Last updated: 2016-09-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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