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  • 1.
    Agrawal, Vikas
    et al.
    IBM Research, , India.
    Archibald, Christopher
    Mississippi State University, Starkville, United States.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Bui, Hung Hai
    Laboratory for Natural Language Understanding, Sunnyvale CA, United States.
    Cook, Diane J.
    Washington State University, Pullman WA, United States.
    Cortés, Juan
    University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Geib, Christopher W.
    Drexel University, Philadelphia PA, United States.
    Gogate, Vibhav
    Department of Computer Science, University of Texas, Dallas, United States.
    Guesgen, Hans W.
    Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
    Jannach, Dietmar
    Technical university Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Johanson, Michael
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Kersting, Kristian
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Intelligente Analyse- und Informationssysteme (IAIS), Sankt Augustin, Germany; The University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Konidaris, George
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge MA, United States.
    Kotthoff, Lars
    INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
    Michalowski, Martin
    Adventium Labs, Minneapolis MN, United States.
    Natarajan, Sriraam
    Indiana University, Bloomington IN, United States.
    O’Sullivan, Barry
    INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
    Pickett, Marc
    Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC, United States.
    Podobnik, Vedran
    Telecommunication Department of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Poole, David
    Department of Computer Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Shastri, Lokendra
    Infosys, , India.
    Shehu, Amarda
    George Mason University, Washington, United States.
    Sukthankar, Gita
    University of Central Florida, Orlando FL, United States.
    The AAAI-13 Conference Workshops2013In: The AI Magazine, ISSN 0738-4602, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The AAAI-13 Workshop Program, a part of the 27th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, was held Sunday and Monday, July 14-15, 2013, at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue Hotel in Bellevue, Washington, USA. The program included 12 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence, including Activity Context-Aware System Architectures (WS-13-05); Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Methods in Computational Biology (WS-13-06); Combining Constraint Solving with Mining and Learning (WS-13-07); Computer Poker and Imperfect Information (WS-13-08); Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using Artificial Intelligence (WS-13-09); Intelligent Robotic Systems (WS-13-10); Intelligent Techniques for Web Personalization and Recommendation (WS-13-11); Learning Rich Representations from Low-Level Sensors (WS-13-12); Plan, Activity,, and Intent Recognition (WS-13-13); Space, Time, and Ambient Intelligence (WS-13-14); Trading Agent Design and Analysis (WS-13-15); and Statistical Relational Artificial Intelligence (WS-13-16)

  • 2.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Freksa, Christian
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Spatial Computing for Design — an Artificial Intelligence Perspective2015In: Studying Visual and Spatial Reasoning for Design Creativity / [ed] Gero, John S., Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands , 2015, p. 109-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The articulation of the Science of Design by Herbert Simon and the paradigmatic relevance of Artificial Intelligence in that context are closely intertwined topics: Simon elaborates the ‘Sciences of the Artificial’ in the context of the design of artefacts. Situated in this AI-centric view of design, we characterize “spatial computing for design” as a specialisation concerned with the development of the general representational and computational apparatus necessary for solving modelling and reasoning problems in spatial design. Several representation and reasoning problems are dis-cussed in the backdrop of relevant examples involving the formal modelling of structural form with respect to a desired/anticipated artefactual function. The discussion, although applicable to any spatial design activity, is grounded in the domain of assistive decision-support in the context of a conventional computer-aided architecture design workflow.

  • 3.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    Cognitive Systems (CoSy), University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Guesgen, Hans W.School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
    Situational Awareness for Assistive Technologies2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of smart assistive technology for personal living and public environments is an opportunity that has been recently recognized by research labs across the world. A particular theme that has garnered attention in many countries is the problem of an aging population. The combination of a much larger elderly population and the ever increasing cost of providing full-time human care for them means that finding practical assisted living solutions for this group is becoming increasingly important. Computing is the obvious choice to provide an answer to this growing problem, but to have a real impact, computer-based assistive technologies will need to possess the ability to interact with, and interpret, the actions and situations of those they are designed to assist.

    The papers in this book explore the diversity of the field of ambient intelligence, as well as the wide range of approaches and variety of applications that may prove to be possible. Consideration is given to how space, action, time, and other contexts can be represented and reasoned about for use in sensory mapping, multi-agent interactions, assisted living, and even emergency responses. Many techniques are examined; variety represents one of the most important strengths of this area, meaning that the weakness of one approach can be offset by the capability of others.

    The book consists of research contributions dealing with the crucial notion of situational awareness within assistive smart systems emerging as an overarching concept. An applied computer science character has been retained, whilst bringing to the fore research projects where formal knowledge representation and reasoning techniques have been demonstrated to be applicable to areas within the broader field of ambient intelligence and smart environments.

  • 4.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Schultz, Carl
    Freksa, Christian
    The ‘Space’ in Spatial Assistance Systems: Conception, Formalisation and Computation2014In: Representing space in cognition: Interrelations of behavior, language, and formal models / [ed] Tenbrink, Thora; Wiener, Jan; Claramunt, Christophe, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is about ‘space’: empty space, spatial structures, and the process of structuring. We organize empty space by building-up structures and artefacts of our everyday existence. This structuring transforms empty space into something of a desired form (e.g. a balanced room, a visually pleasing scene), function (e.g. easily navigable), and semantic connotation (e.g. of a ‘place’). The chapter is written from the perspective of spatial informatics and addresses space at the scale of everyday human perception and thinking. The core of this chapter is to present the informatics of spatial structure; this is done at three levels: (1) the conception of structural form, as it accrues in the minds of people, and its expression, using spatio-linguistic modalities; (2) the formalization of space, using representational means for spatial abstraction; and (3) the computation of structural forms in a manner that constructively assures, assists, and empowers those who conceive of those forms. The chapter is grounded to reality with respect to a particular class of spatial assistance systems, e.g. for spatial design, where our interpretations of creative and constructive assistance are applicable. We also present case studies in domains such as design creativity for media pre-production, and real-time emergency assistance, though architectural design remains an area of special emphasis throughout the chapter.

  • 5.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    Cognitive Systems Group, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Schultz, Carl
    Cognitive Systems Group, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Huang, Minqian
    Digital Media, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    The Shape of Empty Space: Human-centred cognitive foundations in computing for spatial design2012In: 2012 IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing, VL/HCC 2012, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2012, p. 33-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a human-centred model for abstraction, modelling and computing in function-driven spatial design for architecture. The primitive entities of our design conception ontology and computing framework are driven by classic notions of structure, function, and affordance in design, and are directly based on the fundamental human perceptual and analytical modalities of visual and locomotive exploration of space.

    With an emphasis on design semantics, our model for spatial design marks a fundamental shift from contemporary modelling and computational foundations underlying engineering-centred computer aided design systems. We demonstrate the application of our model within a system for human-centred computational design analysis and simulation. We also illustrate the manner in which our design modelling and computing framework seamlessly builds on contemporary industry data modelling standards within the architecture and construction informatics communities.

  • 6.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Cognitive Systems, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; Sonderforschungsbereich Transregional Collaborative Research Center 8, Spatial Cognition, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Suchan, Jakob
    Cognitive Systems, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; Sonderforschungsbereich Transregional Collaborative Research Center 8, Spatial Cognition, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Schultz, Carl
    Cognitive Systems, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; Sonderforschungsbereich Transregional Collaborative Research Center 8, Spatial Cognition, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Cognitive Interpretation of Everyday Activities - Toward Perceptual Narrative Based Visuo-Spatial Scene Interpretation2013In: 2013 Workshop on Computational Models of Narrative / [ed] Mark A. Finlayson; Bernhard Fisseni; Benedikt Löwe; Jan Christoph Meister, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik , 2013, Vol. 32, p. 24-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We position a narrative-centred computational model for high-level knowledge representation and reasoning in the context of a range of assistive technologies concerned with visuo-spatial perception and cognition tasks. Our proposed narrative model encompasses aspects such as space, events, actions, change, and interaction from the viewpoint of commonsense reasoning and learning in large-scale cognitive systems. The broad focus of this paper is on the domain of human-activity interpretation in smart environments, ambient intelligence etc. In the backdrop of a smart meeting cinematography domain, we position the proposed narrative model, preliminary work on perceptual narrativisation, and the immediate outlook on constructing general-purpose open-source tools for perceptual narrativisation.

  • 7.
    Carrascosa, Carlos
    et al.
    Universitat Politécnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
    Klügl, Franziska
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ricci, Alessandro
    Universita di Bologna, Cesena, Italy.
    Virtual Environments 4 MAS2014In: E4MAS - 10 Years Later. Workshop at AAMAS 2014 / [ed] D. Weyns et al., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environment is a key point when talking about MASapplications, being a key concept when developing a platform or appli-cation in the past ten years: what is important in it and how to access it.At the same time, technology has evolved so that Virtual Environment-kinds of applications have grown out of science ction novels till researchpapers and even real applications. Current technology makes possible toMAS to interact also in this environments.In this paper, we have looked for the common ground that have all thedierent domains relating Virtual Environments as E4MAS, and we havecharacterized those domains according to three dimensions: connectionto the physical world of the environment, agents nature, and sociability.Moreover, we comment one of these domains, Mirror Worlds, as it is oneof the most complex domains commented, that we believe that is one ofthe topics to take into account in the near future both as a researh anddeveloping domain.

  • 8. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Fracasso, Francessca
    Orlandini, Andrea
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Lidskog, Marie
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Peter
    Forsberg, Annette
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Turno, Marcello
    Gutierrez, Carlos
    GiraffPlus: D1.1 User Requirements and Design Principles Report2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document reports on the work performed in Task 1.1 User requirements analysis and Task 1.2 GiraffPlus Environment Design Principles. Specifically, it describes the results of a deep involvement of users, both primary (elderly living in their apartment), and secondary (health care professional or family members and friends) recruited in our studies. The report details the qualitative and quantitative research carried out in the three countries of Sweden, Spain and Italy, to elicit user requirements and expectations in terms of type of services as well as system design and appearance. Some qualitative cross-cultural analysis has also been performed in order to highlight differences emerged during the studies in the three countries. Result of this effort is list of user requirements and a set of preferences on different mockups of a component of the system that can be both used to influence the future architecture definition and functional specification of the GiraffPlus system. The work described in this deliverable constitutes the starting point of T1.3 Technological Component Assessment and Selection and overall provides useful hints to the whole system development.

  • 9.
    Efremova, Natalia
    et al.
    Plekhanov Russian University, Moskow, Russia.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Cognitive Architectures for Optimal Remote Image Representation for Driving a Telepresence Robot2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    et al.
    Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    School of Informatics. The Informatics Research Centre, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    School of Informatics. The Informatics Research Centre, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Myreteg, Gunilla
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Huvila, Isto
    Faculty of Social Sciences and Economics, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Åland.
    Patient Empowerment Meets Concerns for Patients: a Study of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records in Sweden2016In: Exploring Complexity in Health: An Interdisciplinary Systems Approach / [ed] Alexander Hoerbst, Werner O. Hackl, Nicolette de Keizer, Hans-Ulrich Prokosch, Mira Hercigonja-Szekeres, Simon de Lusignan, IOS Press , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    As part of a EU project, the Swedish county Uppsala launched a patient portal, Journalen in 2012 [1]. Patients can now access their Electronic Health Records (EHR) online, which is aimed to increase patient empowerment. The medical professionals reacted strongly on patients accessing the medical records. Main concerns were related to quality of care, the effect on their work environment, providing bad news through the eHealth service, and also the wellbeing of patients. While the opportunities of implementing these e-health services seem promising, the concerns of the medical professionals have to be understood and addressed, as well as the actual use of the system by patients. This presentation integrates results from two interview studies with physicians and patients related to patients accessing their medical records online [2,3].

    Method

    The presented results are synthesis of the interviews studies with 12 physicians [2] and 30 patients [3], which took place about 6–12 months after the launch of the portal. The synthesis presented in this paper focus on Technological Frames [4] of physicians and patients including the attitudes and experiences in relation to possible (1) anxiety creation, (2) increased of workload, and (3) the general value of patients reading medical records.

    Results Anxiety creation due to receiving bad news. Many physicians believe that breaking bad news to patients during a patient encounter is vital as this would give them the possibility to also explain treat- ments and answer questions. Somewhat unexpectedly, some patients preferred receiving bad news through Journalen instead of waiting for the physicians. The patients argue that waiting times causes more anxiety. The choice of not accessing is also important, as there are patients who do not want to receive bad news before a patient encounter. Workload increases. Many physicians are worried about the work- load of doctors, as reading the medical record online may result in increased number of phone calls because of anxious patients. However, many patients did not tend to take any additional contacts to ask questions. Some of the patients even believe that access to their medical records reduces the number of contacts with healthcare. Usefulness of accessing online. Many physicians are concerned that online access will have a negative impact on the patient such as increased anxiety and misconceptions as they lack understanding of medical terms. Unlike the doctors’ perspective, many patients argue that they do not have major difficulties in understanding the contents. They also argue that Journalen was central to their coping with their decease.

    Conclusion

    From this study it is clear that the Technological Frames of physicians differ from those of patients, and that they have different attitudes and experiences towards the system. The intention from the politicians was that the system would contribute to Patient Empowerment, but that framing of the technology differs from the physicians’ view, as they are concerned of the consequences. More research is needed on the framing of the technology and how that has been changed after the launch of the system.

    [1] Erlingsdottir, G., Lindholm, C. When patient empowerment encounters professional autonomy: The conflict and negotiation process of inscribing an eHealth service. Scandinavian journal of public administration 2015;19(29):27- 48.

    [2] Grünloh, C., Cajander, Å., Myreteg, G., “The Record is our Work Tool!” - Physicians’ Framing of a Patient Portal in Sweden. J Med Internet Res (submitted).

    [3] Rexhepi, H., Åhlfeldt, R.-M., Cajander, Å, & Huvila, I. (2015). Cancer Patients’ Attitudes and Experiences of Online Medical Records, 1–8. Proceedings of the 17th International Symposium on Health Information Management Research ISHIMR 2015.

    [4] Orlikowski, W.J., Gash, D.C. Technological Frames: Making sense of information technology in organizations. Transactions on Information Systems 1994;12(2):174–207. doi: 10.1145/196734.196745

  • 11.
    Hacker, Benjamin Alexander
    et al.
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Wankerl, Thomas
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Huang, Hung-Hsuan
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Schlichter, Johann
    Technische Universität München, Germany.
    Abdikeev, Niyaz
    Plekhanov University, Moscow.
    Nishida, Toyoaki
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Incorporating intentional and emotional behaviors into a Virtual Human for Better Customer-Engineer-Interaction2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing customer support for technical products means an essential effort for enterprises to satisfy the customer's needs and to challenge rivals in business. This paper introduces a virtual human framework for a better customer engineer interaction. We put emphasis on a preferably natural conversation achieved by continuously analyzing behaviors and emotions of the human user, suggesting his or her intentions and diversification of active and passive intentional behaviors. The underlying architecture is an extension to the generic embodied conversational agent framework which was developed to ease the integration of heterogeneous components into an embodied conversational agent system. These extensions are mainly influenced by SAIBA's architecture for a multimodal behavior generation framework. Although the system has only been accomplished to about 50% partial results show that our approach has the potential to create a more natural like conversational situation.

  • 12.
    Hardell, Lennart
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Effects of Mobile Phones on Children's and Adolescents' Health: A Commentary2017In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 137-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of digital technology has grown rapidly during the last couple of decades. During use, mobile phones and cordless phones emit radiofrequency (RF) radiation. No previous generation has been exposed during childhood and adolescence to this kind of radiation. The brain is the main target organ for RF emissions from the handheld wireless phone. An evaluation of the scientific evidence on the brain tumor risk was made in May 2011 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer at World Health Organization. The scientific panel reached the conclusion that RF radiation from devices that emit nonionizing RF radiation in the frequency range 30 kHz-300 GHz is a Group 2B, that is, a "possible" human carcinogen. With respect to health implications of digital (wireless) technologies, it is of importance that neurological diseases, physiological addiction, cognition, sleep, and behavioral problems are considered in addition to cancer. Well-being needs to be carefully evaluated as an effect of changed behavior in children and adolescents through their interactions with modern digital technologies.

  • 13.
    Helldin, Tove
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Human-centred automation: with application to the fighter aircraft domain2012Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The working situation of fighter pilots is often very challenging. The pilots are requested to perform their tasks and make decisions in situations characterised by time-pressure, huge amounts of data and high workload, knowing that wrong decisions might result in fatal consequences. To aid the pilots, several automatic support systems have been implemented in modern fighter aircraft and will continue to be implemented in pace with technological advancements and new demands posed on the pilots. For example, innovations within the information fusion (IF) domain have made it possible to fuse large amounts of data, stemming from different sensors, databases etc., to create a better foundation for making decisions and act than would have been possible if the information sources had been used separately. However, there are both positive and negative effects of automation, such as decreased workload and improved situation awareness on the one hand, but skill degradation and complacent behaviour on the other. To avoid the possible negative consequences of automation, while at the same time ameliorating the positive ones, a human-centred automation (HCA) approach to system design has been proposed as a way of optimizing the collaboration between the human and the machine. As a design approach, HCA stresses the importance of a cooperative human-machine relationship, where the operator is kept in the automation loop. However, how to introduce HCA within the fighter aircraft domain as well as its implications for the interface and automation design of support systems within the field has not been investigated.

    This thesis investigates the implications of introducing HCA into the fighter aircraft domain. Through literature surveys and empirical investigations, general and domain specific HCA guidelines have been identified. These advocate, for example, that an indication of the reliability of the information and the recommendations provided by the different aircraft support systems must be given as well as that support for appropriate updates of the pilots’ individual and team awareness of the situation must be provided. A demonstrator, mirroring some of the identified guidelines, has been implemented and used to evaluate the guidelines together with system developers within the domain. The evaluation indicated that system developers of modern fighter aircraft implicitly incorporate many of the identified HCA guidelines when designing. However, the evaluation further revealed that to explicitly incorporate these guidelines into the development approach, preferably through the development of a domain specific style guide, would aid the system developers design automated support systems that provide appropriate support for the pilots. The results presented in this thesis are expected to aid developers of modern fighter aircraft support systems by incorporating HCA into the traditional simulator-based design (SBD) approach. This approach is frequently used within the field and stresses early and frequent user-involvement when designing, in which complementary HCA evaluations could be performed to further improve the support systems implemented from an automation perspective. Furthermore, it is expected that the results presented in this thesis will contribute to the research regarding how to incorporate the human operator in the information fusion processes, which has been recognised as a research gap within the IF field. Thus, a further contribution of this thesis is the suggestion of how the HCA development approach could be of aid when improving the interaction between the operator and the automated fusion system.

  • 14.
    Helldin, Tove
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Transparency for future semi-automated systems: effects of transparency on operator performance, workload and trust2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    More and more complex semi-automated systems are being developed, aiding human operators to collect and analyze data and information and even to recommend decisions and act upon these. The goal of such development is often to support the operators make better decisions faster, while at the same time decrease their workload. However, these promises are not always fulfilled and several incidents have highlighted the fact that the introduction of automated technologies might instead increase the need for human involvement andexpertise in the tasks carried out.

    The significance of communicating information regarding an automated system's performance and to explain its strengths and limitations to its operators is strongly highlighted within the system transparencyand operator-centered automation literature. However, it is not common that feedback containing system qualifiers is incorporated into the primary displays of the automated system, obscuring its transparency. In this thesis, we deal with the investigation of the effects of explaining and visualizing system reasoning and performance parameters in different domains on the operators' trust, workload and performance. Different proof-of-concept prototypes have been designed with transparency characteristics in mind, and quantitative and qualitative evaluations together with operators of these systems have been carried out.

    Our results show that the effects of automation transparency can positively influence the performance and trust calibration of operators of complex systems, yet possibly at the costs of higher workload and longer decision-making times. Further, this thesis provides recommendations for designers and developers of automated systems in terms of general design concepts and guidelines for developing transparent automated systems for the future.

  • 15.
    Herring, Susan C.
    et al.
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Fussel, Susan R.
    Cornell University, Ithaca, USA.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mutlu, Bilge
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, USA.
    Neustaedter, Carman
    Simon Fraser University, Surrey, Canada.
    Tsui, Katherine
    Yale University, New Haven, USA.
    The Future of Robotic Telepresence: Visions, Opportunities and Challenges2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 1038-1042Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This panel will bring together experts on robotic telepresence from HCI and related fields. Panelists will engage the audience in a discussion of visions, opportunities and challenges for the future of telepresence robots.

  • 16.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Myreteg, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Empowerment or anxiety?: Research on deployment of online medical e-health services in Sweden2013In: Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 1931-6550, E-ISSN 1550-8366, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 30-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As early e-health efforts progress, it is critical to step back to study their effectiveness and inform expanded implementation. The DOME project is a Swedish research initiative to examine the methods and implications of providing patients access to their own medical records and other e-health services. The focus is on SUSTAINS, a patient access system established in 2012 in 11 European countries. Sweden’s Uppsala county opened access to residents to view their electronic health records with provider notes, lab results, diagnoses and treatments in late 2012. Pre- and post-implementation studies are being carried out through DOME and mixing with the public debate on benefits and drawbacks of easy online access to personal health information. Supporters and critics share concern for quality of care and data security. But advocates focus on better decisions by empowered patients, while detractors, including many healthcare providers, see patient anxiety resulting from insufficient information and lack of consultation. The DOME project is providing the opportunity to analyze all sides of expanded access to electronic health records.

  • 17.
    Jusufi, Ilir
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis CA, United States.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    School of Technology and Business Studies, Computer Engineering Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Visualization of spiral drawing data of patients with Parkinson's disease2014In: Information Visualisation (IV), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2014, p. 346-350Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) need to be frequently monitored in order to assess their individual symptoms and treatment-related complications. Advances in technology have introduced telemedicine for patients in remote locations. However, data produced in such settings lack much information and are not easy to analyze or interpret compared to traditional, direct contact between the patient and clinician. Therefore, there is a need to present the data using visualization techniques in order to communicate in an understandable and objective manner to the clinician. This paper presents interaction and visualization approaches used to aid clinicians in the analysis of repeated measures of spirography of PD patients gathered by means of a telemetry touch screen device. The proposed approach enables clinicians to observe fine motor impairments and identify motor fluctuations of their patients while they perform the tests from their homes using the telemetry device.

  • 18.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    et al.
    Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
    Abdikeev, Niyaz
    Plekhanov Russian Academy of Economics, Moscow, Russia .
    Nishida, Toyoaki
    Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
    Evaluating Humans’ Implicit Attitudes towards an Embodied Conversational Agent2011In: Advances in Neural Networks–ISNN 2011: 8th International Symposium on Neural Networks, ISNN 2011, Guilin, China, May 29–June 1, 2011, Proceedings, Part I, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. -9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the problem of evaluating embodied conversational agents in terms of their communicative performance. We show our attempt to evaluate humans’ implicit attitudes towards different kinds of information presenting by embodied conversational agents using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) rather than gathering explicit data using interviewing methods. We conducted an experiment in which we use the method of indirect measurements with the IAT. The conventional procedure and scoring algorithm of the IAT were used in order to discover possible issues and solutions for future experiments. We discuss key differences between the conventional usage of the IAT and using the IAT in our experiment for evaluating embodied conversational agents using unfamiliar information as test data.

  • 19.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    et al.
    Department of Intelligence Science and Technology, Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
    Hacker, Benjamin Alexander
    Department of Informatics, Munich University of Technology, Munich, Germany.
    Wankerl, Thomas
    Department of Informatics, Munich University of Technology, Munich, Germany.
    Abdikeev, Niyaz
    Plekhanov Russian Academy of Economics, Moscow, Russia.
    Nishida, Toyoaki
    Department of Intelligence Science and Technology, Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
    Toward incorporating emotions with rationality into a communicative virtual agent2011In: AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, ISSN 0951-5666, E-ISSN 1435-5655, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 275-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the problem of human–computer interactions when the computer can interpret and express a kind of human-like behavior, offering natural communication. A conceptual framework for incorporating emotions with rationality is proposed. A model of affective social interactions is described. The model utilizes the SAIBA framework, which distinguishes among several stages of processing of information. The SAIBA framework is extended, and a model is realized in human behavior detection, human behavior interpretation, intention planning, attention tracking behavior planning, and behavior realization components. Two models of incorporating emotions with rationality into a virtual artifact are presented. The first one uses an implicit implementation of emotions. The second one has an explicit realization of a three-layered model of emotions, which is highly interconnected with other components of the system. Details of the model with implicit implementation of emotional behavior are shown as well as evaluation methodology and results. Discussions about the extended model of an agent are given in the final part of the paper.

  • 20.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    The Effect of Field of View on Social Interaction in Mobile Robotic Telepresence Systems2014In: Proceedings of the 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI 2014), IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, p. 214-215Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One goal of mobile robotic telepresence for social interaction is to design robotic units that are easy to operate for novice users and promote good interaction between people. This paper presents an exploratory study on the effect of camera orientation and field of view on the interaction between a remote and local user. Our findings suggest that limiting the width of the field of view can lead to better interaction quality as it encourages remote users to orient the robot towards local users.

  • 21.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sivakumar, Prasanna Kumar
    SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India.
    Srinivas, Chittaranjan S.
    SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India.
    Robot-human hand-overs in non-anthropomorphic robots2013In: Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI'13 / [ed] Hideaki Kuzuoka, Vanessa Evers, Michita Imai, Jodi Forlizzi, IEEE Press, 2013, p. 227-228Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots that assist and interact with humans will inevitably require to successfully achieve the task of handing over objects. Whether it is to deliver desired objects for the elderly living in their homes or hand tools to a worker in a factory, the process of robot hand-overs is one worthy study within the human robot interaction community. While the study of object hand-overs have been studied in previous works, these works have mainly considered anthropomorphic robots, that is, robots that appear and move similar to humans. However, recent trends within robotics, and in particular domestic robotics have witnessed an increase in non-anthropomorphic robotic platforms such as moving tables, teleconferencing robots and vacuum cleaners. The study of robot hand-over for nonanthropomorphic robots and in particular the study of what constitute a successful hand-over is at focus in this paper. For the purpose of investigation, the TurtleBot, which is a moving table like device is used in a home environment.

  • 22.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mosiello, Giovanni
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Semi-Autonomous Cooperative Driving for Mobile Robotic Telepresence Systems2014In: Proceedings of the 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI 2014), IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, p. 104-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile robotic telepresence (MRP) has been introduced to allow communication from remote locations. Modern MRP systems offer rich capabilities for human-human interactions. However, simply driving a telepresence robot can become a burden especially for novice users, leaving no room for interaction at all. In this video we introduce a project which aims to incorporate advanced robotic algorithms into manned telepresence robots in a natural way to allow human-robot cooperation for safe driving. It also shows a very first implementation of cooperative driving based on extracting a safe drivable area in real time using the image stream received from the robot.

  • 23.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Scherlund, Mårten
    Giraff Technologies AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Efremova, Natalia
    Plekhanom University, Moscow, Russia.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Auditory immersion with stereo sound in a mobile robotic telepresence system2015In: 10th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, 2015, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory immersion plays a significant role in generating a good feeling of presence for users driving a telepresence robot. In this paper, one of the key characteristics of auditory immersion - sound source localization (SSL) - is studied from the perspective of those who operate telepresence robots from remote locations. A prototype which is capable of delivering soundscape to the user through Interaural Time Difference (ITD) and Interaural Level Difference (ILD) using the ORTF stereo recording technique was developed. The prototype was evaluated in an experiment and the results suggest that the developed method is sufficient for sound source localization tasks.

  • 24.
    Knudsen, Kati
    et al.
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Högman, Marieann
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Jan
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    How anaesthesiologists understand difficult airway guidelines: an interview study2017In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 243-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the practice of anaesthesia, clinical guidelines that aim to improve the safety of airway procedures have been developed. The aim of this study was to explore how anaesthesiologists understand or conceive of difficult airway management algorithms.

    Methods: A qualitative phenomenographic design was chosen to explore anaesthesiologists’ views on airway algorithms. Anaesthesiologists working in three hospitals were included. Individual face-to-face interviews were conducted.

    Results: Four different ways of understanding were identified, describing airway algorithms as: (A) a law-like rule for how to act in difficult airway situations; (B) a cognitive aid, an action plan for difficult airway situations; (C) a basis for developing flexible, personal action plans for the difficult airway; and (D) the experts’ consensus, a set of scientifically based guidelines for handling the difficult airway.

    Conclusions: The interviewed anaesthesiologists understood difficult airway management guidelines/algorithms very differently.

  • 25.
    Kolkowska, Ella
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Avatare Nöu, Anneli
    RISE SICS, Kista, Sweden.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE SICS, Kista, Sweden.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    A user-centered ethical assessment of welfare technology for elderly2018In: Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population. Applications in Health, Assistance, and Entertainment / [ed] Jia Zhou, Gavriel Salvendy, Springer, 2018, p. 59-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welfare technology (WT) is often developed with a technical perspective, and little consideration is taken regarding the involvement of important ethical considerations and different values that come up during the development and implementation of WT. Safety, security and privacy are significant, as well as the usability and overall benefit of the tool, but to date assessments often lack a holistic picture of the WT as seen by the users. This paper suggests a user-centered ethical assessment (UCEA) framework for WT to be able to evaluate ethical consequences as a part of the user-centered aspects. Building on established methodologies from research on ethical considerations, as well as the research domain of human-computer interaction, this assessment framework joins knowledge of ethical consequences with aspects affecting the “digitalization with the individual in the center”, e.g. privacy, safety, well-being, dignity, empowerment and usability. The framework was applied during development of an interface for providing symptom information to Parkinson patients. The results showed that the UCEA framework directs the attention to values emphasized by the patients. Thus, functionality of the system was evaluated in the light of values and expected results of the patients, thereby facilitating follow-up of a user-centered assessment. The framework may be further developed and tested, but in this study it served as a working tool for assessing ethical consequences of WT as a part of user-centered aspects.

  • 26.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Measuring the quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence systems using presence, spatial formations  and sociometry2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A mobile robotic telepresence (MRP) system is characterized by a video conferencing system which is mounted on a mobile robotic base. The system allows remote pilot users to move the robot around while communicating with local users situated in the robot’s environment. One of the most promising application areas for MRP systems is to deploy them in homes of elderly who are in frequent contact with health care professionals and/or alarm operators. Using MRP systems, elderly can get in immediate contact with these services even without leaving their homes. However, this poses some challenges for the health care professionals and alarm operators. The alarm operators traditionally communicate with their clients using the telephone while the health care professionals see their patients face-to-face with little interference of computer applications. The encounters between health care professionals and patients typically take place at clinics. Neither the health care professionals nor the alarm operators visit the elderly in person. Accordingly, they have no knowledge about the layout of the homes or where the elderly may reside. Thus, the social communication between them and the elderly via MRP systems is more complex than their traditional interaction with elderly.

    This compilation thesis makes a contribution towards understanding how interaction is affected by MRP system embodiment. The work focuses on measuring quality of interaction in MRP systems deployed in domestic settings in elder care. The thesis proposes a set of useful tools for measuring interaction quality. These tools are presence, spatial formations and sociometry. They were selected based on their ability to capture important characteristics for communication via MRP systems, e.g. social communication and mobility, and have been evaluated in experiments with real end-users, that is with alarm operators, health care professionals and elderly. The tools used to conduct the experimental evaluations of MRP systems include video-based evaluations, driving sessions and retrospective interviews. These methods were carefully chosen and take into consideration the organizational background of the participants involved and the challenge of conducting experiments with the aforementioned groups of users.

    List of papers
    1. A review of mobile robotic telepresence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of mobile robotic telepresence
    2013 (English)In: Advances in Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1687-5893, E-ISSN 1687-5907, Vol. 2013, p. 902316-Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile Robotic Telepresence (MRP) systems incorporate video conferencing equipment onto mobile robot devices which can be steered from remote locations. These systems, which are primarily used in the context of promoting social interaction between people, are becoming increasingly popular within certain application domains such as health care environments, independent living for the elderly and office environments. In this review, an overview of the various systems, application areas and challenges found in literature concerning mobile robotic telepresence is provided. The survey also proposes a set terminology for the field as there is currently a lack of standard terms for the different concepts related to MRP systems. Further, this review provides an outlook on the various research directions for developing and enhancing mobile robotic telepresence systems per se, as well as evaluating the interaction in laboratory and field settings. Finally, the survey outlines a number of design implications for the future of mobile robotic telepresence systems for social interaction.

    National Category
    Interaction Technologies Computer Sciences
    Research subject
    Information technology; Computer Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29309 (URN)10.1155/2013/902316 (DOI)2-s2.0-84877272273 (Scopus ID)
    Projects
    ExCITE
    Note

    Advances in Human-Computer InteractionVolume 2013 (2013), Article ID 902316, 17 pages

    Available from: 2013-06-03 Created: 2013-06-03 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
    2. An exploratory study of health professionals' attitudes about robotic telepresence technology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An exploratory study of health professionals' attitudes about robotic telepresence technology
    2011 (English)In: Journal of technology in human services, ISSN 1522-8835, E-ISSN 1522-8991, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 263-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results from a video-based evaluation study of a social robotic telepresence solution for elderly. The evaluated system is a mobile teleoperated robot called Giraff that allows caregivers to virtually enter a home and conduct a natural visit just as if they were physically there. The evaluation focuses on the perspectives from primary healthcare organizations and collects the feedback from different categories of health professionals. The evaluation included 150 participants and yielded unexpected results with respect to the acceptance of the Giraff system. In particular, greater exposure to technology did not necessarily increase acceptance and large variances occurred between the categories of health professionals. In addition to outlining the results, this study provides a number of indications with respect to increasing acceptance for technology for elderly.

    Keywords
    Evaluation, human-robot interaction, organizational perspective
    National Category
    Computer Sciences
    Research subject
    Information technology; Computer Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-23315 (URN)10.1080/15228835.2011.639509 (DOI)2-s2.0-84859363579 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    The final version of this article can be read at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/15228835.2011.639509

    Available from: 2012-11-08 Created: 2012-06-08 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
    3. Measuring the quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence: a pilot's perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring the quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence: a pilot's perspective
    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 89-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a method for measuring the quality of interaction in social mobile robotic telepresence. The methodology is in part based on Adam Kendon's theory of F-formations. The theory is based on observations of how bodies naturally orient themselves during interaction between people in real life settings. In addition, two presence questionnaires (Temple Presence Inventory and Networked Minds Social Presence Inventory), designed to measure the users' perceptions of others and the environment when experienced through a communication medium are used. The perceived presence and ease of use are correlated to the spatial formations between the robot and an actor. The proposed methodology is validated experimentally on a dataset consisting of interactions between an elder (actor) and 21 different users being trained in piloting a mobile robotic telepresence unit. The evaluation has shown that these tools are suitable for evaluating mobile robotic telepresence and also that correlations between the tools used exist. Further, these results give iportant quidlines on how to improve the interface in order to increase the quality of interaction.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2013
    Keywords
    mobile robotic telepresence, F-formations, methodology, presence, telepresence, quality of interaction
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Computer Sciences
    Research subject
    Information technology; Computer Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24238 (URN)10.1007/s12369-012-0166-7 (DOI)000333758400007 ()2-s2.0-84872555676 (Scopus ID)
    Projects
    ExCITE
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    EU under the Ambient Assisted Living Joint Programme

    Available from: 2012-08-06 Created: 2012-08-06 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
    4. Using retrospective interviews to assess interaction quality in mobile robotic telepresence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using retrospective interviews to assess interaction quality in mobile robotic telepresence
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we focus on spatial formations when interacting via mobile robotic telepresence (MRP) systems. Previous research has found that those who used a MRP system to make a remote visit (pilot users) tended to use different spatial formations from what is typical in humanhuman interaction. In this paper, we present the results of a study where a pilot user interacted with ten elderly via a MRP system. Intentional deviations from known accepted spatial formations were made in order to study their effect on interaction quality from the local user perspective. Using a retrospective interviews technique, the elderly commented on the interaction and confirmed the importance of adhering to acceptable spatial configurations. The results show that there is a mismatch between pilot behavior and local user preference and that it is important to evaluate a MRP system from two perspectives, the pilot user’s and the local user’s .

    Keywords
    F-formations, Mobile Robotic Telepresence, MRP systems, Quality of Interaction, Retrospective Interview, Spatial Formations, Spatial Configurations
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Computer Sciences
    Research subject
    Information technology; Computer Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29091 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-21 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    5. Towards measuring quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence using sociometric badges.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards measuring quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence using sociometric badges.
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of mobile robotic telepresence for social communication is in rapid expansion and it is of interest to understand what promotes good interaction. In this paper, we present the results of an experiment where novice users were given a guided tour while maneuvering a mobile robotic telepresence system for the first time. In a previous study, it was found that subjective presence questionnaires and observations of spatial configurations based on Kendon’s F-formations were useful to evaluate quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence. In an effort to find more automatized methods to assess the quality of interaction, the study in this paper used the same measures with an addition of objective sociometric measures. Experimental results show that the quantitative analysis of the sociometric data correlates with a number of parameters gathered via qualitative analysis, e.g. different dimensions of presence and observed problems in maneuvering the robot. The implications of this form a basis upon which a methodology for measuring interaction quality can be obtained.

    Keywords
    Mobile Robotic Telepresence, F-formations, Spatial Formations, Presence, Telepresence, Sociometry, Methodology, Quality of Interaction
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Computer Sciences
    Research subject
    Information technology; Computer Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29095 (URN)
    Note

    Now also published as an article:  http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/pjbr.2013.4.issue-1/pjbr-2013-0005/pjbr-2013-0005.xml?format=INT

    Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-21 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
  • 27.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Spatial configuration in communication via a MRP system2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28. Kristoffersson, Annica
    et al.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Eklundh, Kerstin Severinson
    KTH.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Towards measuring quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence using sociometric badges.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of mobile robotic telepresence for social communication is in rapid expansion and it is of interest to understand what promotes good interaction. In this paper, we present the results of an experiment where novice users were given a guided tour while maneuvering a mobile robotic telepresence system for the first time. In a previous study, it was found that subjective presence questionnaires and observations of spatial configurations based on Kendon’s F-formations were useful to evaluate quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence. In an effort to find more automatized methods to assess the quality of interaction, the study in this paper used the same measures with an addition of objective sociometric measures. Experimental results show that the quantitative analysis of the sociometric data correlates with a number of parameters gathered via qualitative analysis, e.g. different dimensions of presence and observed problems in maneuvering the robot. The implications of this form a basis upon which a methodology for measuring interaction quality can be obtained.

  • 29.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Eklundh, Kerstin Severinson
    KTH.
    Using retrospective interviews to assess interaction quality in mobile robotic telepresenceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we focus on spatial formations when interacting via mobile robotic telepresence (MRP) systems. Previous research has found that those who used a MRP system to make a remote visit (pilot users) tended to use different spatial formations from what is typical in humanhuman interaction. In this paper, we present the results of a study where a pilot user interacted with ten elderly via a MRP system. Intentional deviations from known accepted spatial formations were made in order to study their effect on interaction quality from the local user perspective. Using a retrospective interviews technique, the elderly commented on the interaction and confirmed the importance of adhering to acceptable spatial configurations. The results show that there is a mismatch between pilot behavior and local user preference and that it is important to evaluate a MRP system from two perspectives, the pilot user’s and the local user’s .

  • 30.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Measuring the quality of interaction in mobile robotic telepresence: a pilot's perspective2013In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 89-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a method for measuring the quality of interaction in social mobile robotic telepresence. The methodology is in part based on Adam Kendon's theory of F-formations. The theory is based on observations of how bodies naturally orient themselves during interaction between people in real life settings. In addition, two presence questionnaires (Temple Presence Inventory and Networked Minds Social Presence Inventory), designed to measure the users' perceptions of others and the environment when experienced through a communication medium are used. The perceived presence and ease of use are correlated to the spatial formations between the robot and an actor. The proposed methodology is validated experimentally on a dataset consisting of interactions between an elder (actor) and 21 different users being trained in piloting a mobile robotic telepresence unit. The evaluation has shown that these tools are suitable for evaluating mobile robotic telepresence and also that correlations between the tools used exist. Further, these results give iportant quidlines on how to improve the interface in order to increase the quality of interaction.

  • 31.
    Kurfess, Franz J.
    et al.
    California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo CA, United States.
    Flanagan, Gregory
    California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo CA, United States.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    SFB/TR 8 Spatial Cognition, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Spatial Interactions between Humans and Assistive Agents2011In: Help me help you: bridging the gaps in human-agent collaboration : papers from the AAAI Spring Symposium / [ed] Rajiv Maheswaran, Nathan Schurr, and Pedro Szekely, Menlo Park, Menlo Park, California, USA: AAAI press , 2011, p. 42-47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While computers assist humans with tasks such as navigation that involve spatial aspects, agents that can interact in a meaningful way in this context are still in their infancy. One core issue is the mismatch in the representation of spatial information a computer-based system is likely to use, and the one a human is likely to use. Computers are better suited for quantitative schemes such as maps or diagrams that rely on measurable distances between entities. Humans frequently use higher-level, domain-specific conceptual representations such as buildings, rooms, or streets for orientation purposes. Combined with the person-centric world view that we often assume when we refer to spatial information, it is challenging for agents to convert statements using spatial references into assertions that match their own internal representation. In this paper, we discuss an approach that uses natural language processing and information extraction tool kits to identify entities and statements about their spatial relations. These extractions are then processed by a spatial reasoner to convert them from the human conceptual space into the quantitative space used by the computer-based agent.

  • 32.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Tshering, Gaki
    Informatics, Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fogelberg, Martin
    Informatics, Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jusufi, Ilir
    Department of Computer Science and Media Technology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Kolkowska, Ella
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Klein, Gunnar O.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    An interface for IoT: feeding back health-related data to Parkinson's disease patients2018In: Journal of Sensor and Actuator Networks, ISSN 1007-7294, E-ISSN 1089-747X, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a user-centered design (UCD) process of an interface for Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients for helping them to better manage their symptoms. The interface is designed to visualize symptom and medication information, collected by an Internet of Things (IoT)-based system, which will consist of a smartphone, electronic dosing device, wrist sensor and a bed sensor. In our work, the focus is on measuring data related to some of the main health-related quality of life aspects such as motor function, sleep, medication compliance, meal intake timing in relation to medication intake, and physical exercise. A mock-up demonstrator for the interface was developed using UCD methodology in collaboration with PD patients. The research work was performed as an iterative design and evaluation process based on interviews and observations with 11 PD patients. Additional usability evaluations were conducted with three information visualization experts. Contributions include a list of requirements for the interface, results evaluating the performance of the patients when using the demonstrator during task-based evaluation sessions as well as opinions of the experts. The list of requirements included ability of the patients to track an ideal day, so they could repeat certain activities in the future as well as determine how the scores are related to each other. The patients found the visualizations as clear and easy to understand and could successfully perform the tasks. The evaluation with experts showed that the visualizations are in line with the current standards and guidelines for the intended group of users. In conclusion, the results from this work indicate that the proposed system can be considered as a tool for assisting patients in better management of the disease by giving them insights on their own aggregated symptom and medication information. However, the actual effects of providing such feedback to patients on their health-related quality of life should be investigated in a clinical trial.

  • 33.
    Mosiello, Giovanni
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Universitá degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Using augmented reality to improve usability of the user interface for driving a telepresence robot2013In: Paladyn - Journal of Behavioral Robotics, ISSN 2080-9778, E-ISSN 2081-4836, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 174-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile Robotic Telepresence (MRP) helps people to communicate in natural ways despite being physically located in different parts of the world. User interfaces of such systems are as critical as the design and functionality of the robot itself for creating conditions for natural interaction. This article presents an exploratory study analysing different robot teleoperation interfaces. The goals of this paper are to investigate the possible effect of using augmented reality as the means to drive a robot, to identify key factors of the user interface in order to improve the user experience through a driving interface, and to minimize interface familiarization time for non-experienced users. The study involved 23 participants whose robot driving attempts via different user interfaces were analysed. The results show that a user interface with an augmented reality interface resulted in better driving experience.

  • 34. Rexhepi, Hanife
    et al.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    Cajander, Åsa
    Bildanalys och människa-datorinteraktion, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    "Please do not confuse your Google search with my medical degree"?2016In: Designing eHealth Services for Patients and Relatives: NordiCHI 2016 Workshop, WorldPress , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35. Sahlin, Johannes S.
    et al.
    Tsertsidis, Antonios
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Islam, Sirajul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Usages and impacts of the integration of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in elementary classrooms: case study of Swedish municipality schools2017In: Interactive Learning Environments, ISSN 1049-4820, E-ISSN 1744-5191, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 561-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, many schools have started to implement information and communication technologies (ICTs)-based learning devices (such as laptops, tablets, mobile phones, and active boards) in the classroom settings in order to increase learning outcomes. The aim of this study is to find which activities and outcomes are evident in the usages of computing devices and how those devices aid elementary-level students in their learning activities. The study includes five overt participant observations at some schools in a Swedish municipality including unstructured interviews and explains the findings through activity theory and the Alberta Education Framework for Student Learning . The major activities found were dealing with the (1) educational application assignments, (2) storytelling, (3) report writing and (4) practical interaction assignments. We concluded that ICTs aid students in becoming more concentrated, focus driven, engaged and amused, thus learning becomes more interesting.

  • 36.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Department of Medical Sciences, Biomedical Informatics and Engineering, Uppsala University, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Visualization and Interaction Design for Ubiquitous Access to Shared Medical Information2005In: Human-computer interaction: INTERACT 2005: IFIP TC13 international conference on Human-computer interaction, 12th-16th September 2005, Rome, Italy: adjunct proceedings / [ed] Buono, Costabile, Paternò & Santoro, Bari: Laterza, Giuseppe , 2005, p. 39-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the research work is to develop prototypes for visualization of and interaction with medical information for some specific clinical work situations and to conduct usability tests in order to ensure future guidelines’ validity and reliability. For prototype development user centred system design (UCSD) is used and so far, the specific requirements for applying UCSD in the health care area have been identified. New demands for visualization and interaction design in mobile and shared care considering both the users and the context of use are described.

  • 37.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    et al.
    Dept of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Centre for EHealth, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Maria
    Dept of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Centre for EHealth, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Koch, Sabine
    Dept of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Centre for EHealth, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Visualisation and interaction design solutions to address specific demands in shared home care2006In: Ubiquity: Technologies for Better Health in Aging Societies: Proceedings of MIE2006 / [ed] Hasman, A; Haux, R; van der Lei, J; De Clercq, E; Roger France, FH, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2006, Vol. 124, p. 71-76Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When care professionals from different organisations are involved in patient care, their different views on the care process may not be meaningfully integrated.

    Objective: To use visualisation and interaction design solutions addressing the specific demands of shared care in order to support a collaborative work process.

    Methods: Participatory design, comprising interdisciplinary seminar series with real users and iterative prototyping, was applied.

    Results: A set of interaction and visualisation design solutions to address care professionals' requirements in shared home care is presented, introducing support for identifying origin of information, holistic presentation of information, user group specific visualisation, avoiding cognitive overload, coordination of work and planning, and quick overviews. The design solutions are implemented in an integrated virtual health record system supporting cooperation and coordination in shared home care for the elderly. The described requirements are, however, generalized to comprise all shared care work.

    Conclusion: The presented design considerations allow healthcare professionals in different organizations to share patient data on mobile devices. Visualization and interaction design facilitates specific work situations and assists in handling specific demands in shared care. The user interface is adapted to different user groups with similar yet distinct needs. Consequently different views supporting cooperative work and presenting shared information in holistic overviews are developed.

  • 38.
    Suchan, Jakob
    et al.
    Spatial Reasoning, EASE CRC: Everyday Activity Science and Engineering, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Spatial Reasoning, EASE CRC: Everyday Activity Science and Engineering, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Deep semantic abstractions of everyday human activities: On commonsense representations of human interactions2017In: ROBOT 2017: Third Iberian Robotics Conference. Vol. 1 / [ed] Anibal Ollero, Alberto Sanfeliu, Luis Montano, Nuno Lau, Carlos Cardeira, Springer, 2017, p. 477-488Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a deep semantic characterisation of space and motion categorically from the viewpoint of grounding embodied human-object interactions. Our key focus is on an ontological model that would be adept to formalisation from the viewpoint of commonsense knowledge representation, relational learning, and qualitative reasoning about space and motion in cognitive robotics settings. We demonstrate key aspects of the space & motion ontology and its formalisation as a representational framework in the backdrop of select examples from a dataset of everyday activities. Furthermore, focussing on human-object interaction data obtained from RGBD sensors, we also illustrate how declarative (spatio-temporal) reasoning in the (constraint) logic programming family may be performed with the developed deep semantic abstractions.

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