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  • 1.
    AGALOMBA, CHRISTINE AFANDI
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Factors contributing to failure of egovernment projects in developing countries: a literature review2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Al-Dabbagh, Mustafa
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Electronic Government in Iraq: Challenges of development and implementation2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Andreasson, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    6D scan registration using depth-interpolated local image features2010In: Robotics and Autonomous Systems, ISSN 0921-8890, E-ISSN 1872-793X, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 157-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a novel registration approach that is based on a combination of visual and 3D range information.To identify correspondences, local visual features obtained from images of a standard color camera are compared and the depth of matching features (and their position covariance) is determined from the range measurements of a 3D laserscanner. The matched depth-interpolated image features allows to apply registration with known correspondences.We compare several ICP variants in this paper and suggest an extension that considers the spatial distance betweenmatching features to eliminate false correspondences. Experimental results are presented in both outdoor and indoor environments. In addition to pair-wise registration, we also propose a global registration method that registers allscan poses simultaneously.

  • 4.
    Azam, Khwaja Mehedi
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Munim, Md Fazle
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Measurement of E-Service Quality: Study on Jessor DC Office, Bangladesh2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 5.
    Bakibinga, Stella
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    User Acceptance of Information Systems among Local Governments in Uganda: The Pilot of the Education Management Information System in Jinja District.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 6.
    Balasooriya, Isuru
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The Road to One-to-one Computing: An empirical study in Sri Lanka2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 7.
    Brewka, Gerhard
    et al.
    Univ. of Leipzig, Germany.
    Coradeschi, SilviaÖrebro University, Department of Technology.Perini, AnnaÖrebro University, Department of Technology.Traverso, PaoloSRA, ITC-irst, Trento, Italy.
    Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, August 29 - September 1, 2006, Riva del Garda, Italy: including Prestigious Applications of Intelligent Systems (PAIS 2006)2006Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Didier Mpah, Nde Jacob
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Computerized ID cards and passports in Cameroon: What the police identification department perceive of the system2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 9.
    Egowan, Ritah Ejeckenbe
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Assessing e-services from a user perspective: A study of the Swedish electronic tax declaration.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    E-services including electronic tax declaration are becoming trendy in Sweden. Many resources are invested in their development but evaluation from user’s perspective is limited. Sweden has big plans to become the leading internet nation by 2015. Are citizens opinion taken into consideration during such initiatives? Are the citizens satisfied with the e-services they have in place? With a sample size of 90, this paper studies the e-tax system in Sweden from six information system success variables.  The DeLone and &McLean IS success model was adopted to analyze the research question “What is the user’s perception of electronic tax declaration in Sweden”.  Perception in this paper means physical impression interpreted in the light of experience. Online survey method was applied and results revealed that all six variables were successful. Time factor, security concerns and convenience influence e-service usage.  Elderly exclusion, adaptability and language barriers were the major problems with the e-tax system. On a whole, this paper aims at providing general contributions to e-service research in the future.

  • 10.
    Goossen, William T. F.
    et al.
    Acquest Research and Development, Koudekerk aan den Rijn, Netherlands; University of Iowa, Iowa City, United States.
    Ozbolt, Judy G.
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, United States .
    Coenen, Amy
    ICN Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, United States .
    Park, Hyeoun-Ae
    Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Mead, Charles
    University of California, San Francisco, United States; HL7 Modeling/Methodol. Tech. Comm., Ann Arbor, United States; Oracle Corporation, Redwood Shores,, United States.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Marin, Heimar F.
    Federal University of Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, United States; University of Iowa, College of Nursing, Iowa City, United States .
    Development of a provisional domain model for the nursing process for use within the Health Level 7 reference information model2004In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 186-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Since 1999, the Nursing Terminology Summits have promoted the development, evaluation, and use of reference terminology for nursing and its integration into comprehensive health care data standards. The use of such standards to represent nursing knowledge, terminology, processes, and information in electronic health records will enhance continuity of care, decision support, and the exchange of comparable patient information. As part of this activity, working groups at the 2001, 2002, and 2003 Summit Conferences examined how to represent nursing information in the Health Level 7 (HL7) Reference Information Model (RIM).

    Design: The working groups represented the nursing process as a dynamic sequence of phases, each containing information specific to the activities of the phase. They used Universal Modeling Language (UML) to represent this domain knowledge in models. An Activity Diagram was used to create a dynamic model of the nursing process. After creating a structural model of the information used at each stage of the nursing process, the working groups mapped that information to the HL7 RIM. They used a hierarchical structure for the organization of nursing knowledge as the basis for a hierarchical model for "Findings about the patient." The modeling and mapping reported here were exploratory and preliminary, not exhaustive or definitive. The intent was to evaluate the feasibility of representing some types of nursing information consistently with HL7 standards.

    Measurements: The working groups conducted a small-scale validation by testing examples of nursing terminology against the HL7 RIM class "Observation."

    Results: It was feasible to map patient information from the proposed models to the RIM class "Observation." Examples illustrate the models and the mapping of nursing terminology to the HL7 RIM.

    Conclusion: It is possible to model and map nursing information into the comprehensive health care information model, the HL7 RIM. These models must evolve and undergo further validation by clinicians. The integration of nursing information, terminology, and processes in information models is a first step toward rendering nursing information machine-readable in electronic patient records and messages. An eventual practical result, after much more development, would be to create computable, structured information for nursing documentation.

  • 11.
    Göransson, Katarina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Fonteyn, Marsha
    Dana-Farber Cancer Center, Boston, MA, United States.
    The use of qualitative data analysis software (QDAS) to manage and support the analysis of think aloud (TA) data2006In: Consumer-Centered Computer-Suppported Care for Healthy People, Amsterdam, Netherlands: IOS Press, 2006, Vol. 122, p. 143-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This methodological paper describes how qualitative data analysis software (QDAS) is being used to manage and support a three-step protocol analysis (PA) of think aloud (TA) data in a study examining emergency nurses' reasoning during triage. The authors believe that QDAS program QRS NVivo will greatly facilitate the PA and will allow them to identify and describe the information that triage nurses concentrate on during triage, and how they structure this information to make a triage decision. These findings could assist in designing and creating decision support systems to guide nurses' triaging. Additionally, details about how to use QRS NVivo for PA of TA data may assist and guide future informatics research using similar methodology are presented here. This innovative use of QDAS holds great promise for future nursing informatics research.

  • 12.
    Hasan, Mohammad Mahmudul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Evaluation of Citizen Help Request (CHR) initiated by Bangladesh Police: A Case Study2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 13.
    Husnain, Ali
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Identifying the existing status of e-services' sustainability research2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 14.
    Hyseni, Ngadhnjim
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Rajaeian, Hassan
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Prioritization of e-services in the decision-making process2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 15.
    Ibembe, John Daniel
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Mobile phone use and reproductive health care in Nakuru Provincial Hospital, Kenya2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 16.
    Ibn, Hakim Md. Alif
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Islam, Md Nazrul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Expected Challenges to implement Telemedicine service in public hospitals of Bangladesh2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 17.
    Ishmael, Shu Aghanifor
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Information and Communication Technology in developing economies: A literature review on the reasons for failures of ICT; The case of Cameroon2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Kizhakethil, Joseph Shaji
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    A comparative study of e-Government strategies of Nordic Countries2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 19.
    Köckemann, Uwe
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Constraint-based Methods for Human-aware Planning2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As more robots and sensors are deployed in work and home environments, there is a growing need for these devices to act with some degree of autonomy to fulfill their purpose. Automated planning can be used to synthesize plans of action that achieve this. The main challenge addressed in this thesis is to consider how the automated planning problem changes when considered in the context of environments that are populated by humans. Humans have their own plans, and automatically generated plans should not interfere with these. We refer to this as social acceptability. Opportunities for proactive behavior often arise during execution. The planner should be able to identify these opportunities and proactively plan accordingly. Both social acceptability and proactivity require the planner to identify relevant situations from available information. We refer to this capability as context-awareness, and it may require complex inferences based on observed human activities. Finally, planning may have to consider cooperation with humans to reach common goals or to enable robots and humans to support one another.

    This thesis analyzes the requirements that emerge from human-aware planning — what it takes to make automated planning socially acceptable, proactive, context aware, and to make it support cooperation with humans. We formally state the human-aware planning problem, and propose a planning and execution framework for human-aware planning that is based on constraint reasoning and flaw-resolution techniques, and which fulfills the identified requirements. This approach is modular and extendable: new types of constraints can be added and solvers can be exchanged and re-arranged. This allows us to address the identified requirements for humanaware planning. In particular, we introduce Interaction Constraints (ICs) for this purpose, and propose patterns of Ics for social acceptability, proactivity, and contextawareness. We also consider cooperative plans in which certain actions are assigned to humans and the implications that this has. We evaluate the proposed methods and patterns on a series of use cases, as well as a variety of domains including a real-world robotic system. We evaluate the proposed methods and patterns on a series of use cases, as well as a variety of domains including a real-world robotic system. introduce Interaction Constraints (ICs) for this purpose, and propose patterns of ICs for social acceptability, proactivity, and context-awareness. We also consider cooperative plans in which certain actions are assigned to humans and the implications that this has. We evaluate the proposed methods and patterns on a series of use cases, as well as a variety of domains including a real-world robotic system.

  • 20.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Reggente, Matteo
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Trincavelli, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Blanco, Jose Luis
    Dept. of System Engineering and Automation, University of Malaga.
    Gonzalez, Javier
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A statistical approach to gas distribution modelling with mobile robots: the Kernel DM+V algorithm2009In: IEEE/RSJ international conference on intelligent robots and systems: IROS 2009, IEEE conference proceedings, 2009, p. 570-576Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gas distribution modelling constitutes an ideal application area for mobile robots, which – as intelligent mobile gas sensors – offer several advantages compared to stationary sensor networks. In this paper we propose the Kernel DM+V algorithm to learn a statistical 2-d gas distribution model from a sequence of localized gas sensor measurements. The algorithm does not make strong assumptions about the sensing locations and can thus be applied on a mobile robot that is not primarily used for gas distribution monitoring, and also in the case of stationary measurements. Kernel DM+V treats distribution modelling as a density estimation problem. In contrast to most previous approaches, it models the variance in addition to the distribution mean. Estimating the predictive variance entails a significant improvement for gas distribution modelling since it allows to evaluate the model quality in terms of the data likelihood. This offers a solution to the problem of ground truth evaluation, which has always been a critical issue for gas distribution modelling. Estimating the predictive variance also provides the means to learn meta parameters and to suggest new measurement locations based on the current model. We derive the Kernel DM+V algorithm and present a method for learning the hyper-parameters. Based on real world data collected with a mobile robot we demonstrate the consistency of the obtained maps and present a quantitative comparison, in terms of the data likelihood of unseen samples, with an alternative approach that estimates the predictive variance.

  • 21.
    Lim, Nena
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Digital forensic certification versus forensic science certification2008In: ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law, 2008, p. 7-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies often rely on certifications to select appropriate individuals in disciplines such as accounting and engineering. The general public also tends to have confidence in a professional who has some kinds of certification because certification implies a standard of excellence and that the individual has expert knowledge in a specific discipline. An interesting question to the digital forensic community is: How is a digital forensic certification compared to a forensic science certification? The objective of this paper is to compare the requirements of a digital forensic certification to those of a forensic science certification. Results of the comparison shed lights on the maturity level of the digital forensic discipline and reveal what can be improved to enhance the confidence and trust of the general public on the digital forensic profession.

  • 22.
    Lim, Nena
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Escaping the computer-forensics certification maze: a survey of professional certifications2008In: Communications of the Association for Information Systems, ISSN 1529-3181, E-ISSN 1529-3181, Vol. 23, p. 547-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the proliferation of computer crime, the demand for computer-forensics experts continues to increase. Yet with so many computer-forensics certifications currently available, it is not an easy task for those outside the discipline to understand the differences among the various certifications. The objective of this paper is to provide a comprehensive analysis of all the existing computer-forensics certifications for the benefits of non-computer- forensics practitioners. Twenty-six computer-forensics certifications offered by 17 different associations are described and compared based on criteria such as certification requirements and knowledge coverage. The paper is useful to three groups of readers: (1) individuals who want to join the computer-forensics profession; (2) academics who are responsible for curriculum development in computer forensics; and (3) top-level managers who want to recruit computer-forensics professionals.

  • 23.
    Lim, Nena
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Khoo, Anne
    Forensics of computers and handheld devices: identical or fraternal twins?2009In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 132-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lindfors, Erno
    et al.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Mattila, Jussi
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tampere, Finland.
    Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti V.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Pesonen, Antti
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Lötjönen, Jyrki
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tampere, Finland.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Heterogeneous biological network visualization system: case study in context of medical image data2012In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 736, p. 95-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a system called megNet for integrating and visualizing heterogeneous biological data in order to enable modeling biological phenomena using a systems approach. Herein we describe megNet, including a recently developed user interface for visualizing biological networks in three dimensions and a web user interface for taking input parameters from the user, and an in-house text mining system that utilizes an existing knowledge base. We demonstrate the software with a case study in which we integrate lipidomics data acquired in-house with interaction data from external databases, and then find novel interactions that could possibly explain our previous associations between biological data and medical images. The flexibility of megNet assures that the tool can be applied in diverse applications, from target discovery in medical applications to metabolic engineering in industrial biotechnology.

  • 25.
    Liu, Li
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Shi, Yang
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Wang, Xuyang
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Benefits and challenges of using Micro-Blog: A case of Chinese e-government initiative2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 26.
    Loutfi, Amy
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Gonzalez, Javier
    Dept. of System Engineering and Automation, University of Malaga.
    Gas Distribution Mapping of Multiple Odour Sources using a Mobile Robot2009In: Robotica (Cambridge. Print), ISSN 0263-5747, E-ISSN 1469-8668, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 311-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile olfactory robots can be used in a number of relevant application areas where a better understanding of agas distribution is needed, such as environmental monitoring and safety and security related fields. In this paper wepresent a method to integrate the classification of odours together with gas distribution mapping. The resulting odourmap is then correlated with the spatial information collected from a laser range scanner to form a combined map.Experiments are performed using a mobile robot in large and unmodified indoor and outdoor environments. Multipleodour sources are used and are identified using only transient information from the gas sensor response. The resultingmulti level map can be used as a intuitive representation of the collected odour data for a human user.

  • 27.
    Magnusson, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Andreasson, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Nüchter, Andreas
    Jacobs University Bremen.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Automatic appearance-based loop detection from three-dimensional laser data using the normal distributions transform2009In: Journal of Field Robotics, ISSN 1556-4959, E-ISSN 1556-4967, Vol. 26, no 11-12, p. 892-914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a new approach to appearance-based loop detection for mobile robots, usingthree-dimensional (3D) laser scans. Loop detection is an important problem in the simultaneouslocalization and mapping (SLAM) domain, and, because it can be seen as theproblem of recognizing previously visited places, it is an example of the data associationproblem. Without a flat-floor assumption, two-dimensional laser-based approaches arebound to fail in many cases. Two of the problems with 3D approaches that we address inthis paper are how to handle the greatly increased amount of data and how to efficientlyobtain invariance to 3D rotations.We present a compact representation of 3D point cloudsthat is still discriminative enough to detect loop closures without false positives (i.e.,detecting loop closure where there is none). A low false-positive rate is very important becausewrong data association could have disastrous consequences in a SLAM algorithm.Our approach uses only the appearance of 3D point clouds to detect loops and requires nopose information. We exploit the normal distributions transform surface representationto create feature histograms based on surface orientation and smoothness. The surfaceshape histograms compress the input data by two to three orders of magnitude. Becauseof the high compression rate, the histograms can be matched efficiently to compare theappearance of two scans. Rotation invariance is achieved by aligning scans with respectto dominant surface orientations. We also propose to use expectation maximization to fit a gamma mixture model to the output similarity measures in order to automatically determinethe threshold that separates scans at loop closures from nonoverlapping ones.Wediscuss the problem of determining ground truth in the context of loop detection and thedifficulties in comparing the results of the few available methods based on range information.Furthermore, we present quantitative performance evaluations using three realworlddata sets, one of which is highly self-similar, showing that the proposed methodachieves high recall rates (percentage of correctly identified loop closures) at low falsepositiverates in environments with different characteristics.

  • 28.
    Mersie, Senay
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Mobile service readiness in Ethiopia: Technological and social perspective2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade the growth of mobile technology and distribution of mobile phones is much faster as compared to the distribution and availability of personal computers. By the end of 2008, there were 246 million mobile subscriptions in Africa and some African countries are approaching 100% mobile population coverage. In Ethiopia currently there are no visible initiatives that can support the delivery of public service by utilizing the mobile technology. The overall aim of the research is to investigate the current technological and social readiness in Ethiopia to successfully implement mobile service. To achieve our aim we conduct a web survey along with an interview. From our results we come up with the conclusion that currently mobile phones are the best option available to provide public service, which can be accessed by more peoples in Ethiopia. Also Ethiopia is technologically and socially ready to implement mobile services.

  • 29.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Informatics and computational strategies for the study of lipids2011In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1811, no 11, p. 991-999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to translate vast amounts of information, as obtained from lipidomic analysis, into the knowledge and understanding of biological phenomena is an important challenge faced by the lipidomics community. While many of the informatics and computational tools from other domains such as bioinformatics and metabolomics are also applicable to lipidomics data processing and analysis, new solutions and strategies are needed for the studies of lipidomes at the systems level. This is due to enormous functional and structural diversity of lipids as well as because of their complex regulation at multiple spatial and temporal scales. In order to better understand the lipidomes at the physiological level, lipids need to be modeled not only at the level of biological pathways but also at the level of the biophysical systems they are part of, such as cellular membranes or lipoprotein particles. Herein the current state, recent advances and new opportunities in the field of lipid bioinformatics are reviewed.

  • 30.
    Reggente, Matteo
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Using local wind information for gas distribution mapping in outdoor environments with a mobile robot2009In: IEEE sensors, vols 1-3, New York: IEEE conference proceedings, 2009, p. 1637-1642Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we introduce a statistical method tobuild two-dimensional gas distribution maps (Kernel DM+V/Walgorithm). In addition to gas sensor measurements, the proposedmethod also takes into account wind information by modelingthe information content of the gas sensor measurements as abivariate Gaussian kernel whose shape depends on the measuredwind vector. We evaluate the method based on real measurementsin an outdoor environment obtained with a mobile robot thatwas equipped with gas sensors and an ultrasonic anemometerfor wind measurements. As a measure of the model quality wecompute how well unseen measurements are predicted in termsof the data likelihood. The initial results are encouraging andshow a clear improvement of the proposed method compared tothe case where wind is not considered.

  • 31.
    Rivas Diaz, Juan Manuel
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Model-based object tracking with an infrared stereo camera2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Object tracking has become really important in the field of robotics in the last

    years. Frequently, the goal is to obtain the trajectory of the tracked target over

    time and space by acquiring and processing information from the sensors.

    In this thesis we are interested in tracking objects at a very short range. The

    primary application of our approach is targeting the domain of object tracking

    during grasp execution with a hand-in-eye sensor setup. To this end, a

    promising approach investigated in this work is based on the Leap Motion

    sensor, which is designed for tracking human hands. However, we are

    interested in tracking grasped objects thus we need to extend its functionality.

    The main goal of the thesis is to track the 3D position and orientation of an

    object from a set of simple primitives (cubes, cylinders, triangles) over a video

    sequence. That is the reason we have designed and developed two different

    approaches for tracking objects with the Leap Motion device as stereo vision

    system.

  • 32.
    Stachniss, Cyrill
    et al.
    University of Freiburg.
    Plagemann, Christian
    Stanford University.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Learning Gas Distribution Models Using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixtures2009In: Autonomous Robots, ISSN 0929-5593, E-ISSN 1573-7527, Vol. 26, no 2-3, p. 187-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we consider the problem of learning two-dimensional spatial models of gas distributions. To build models of gas distributions that can be used to accurately predict the gas concentration at query locations is a challenging task due to the chaotic nature of gas dispersal. We formulate this task as a regression problem. To deal with the specific properties of gas distributions, we propose a sparse Gaussian process mixture model, which allows us to accurately represent the smooth background signal and the areas with patches of high concentrations. We furthermore integrate the sparsification of the training data into an EM procedure that we apply for learning the mixture components and the gating function. Our approach has been implemented and tested using datasets recorded with a real mobile robot equipped with an electronic nose. The experiments demonstrate that our technique is well-suited for predicting gas concentrations at new query locations and that it outperforms alternative and previously proposed methods in robotics.

  • 33.
    Stoyanov, Todor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Maximum likelihood point cloud acquisition from a mobile platform2009In: International conference on advanced robotics, ICAR 2009., New York: IEEE conference proceedings, 2009, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an approach to acquire locally consistent range data scans from a moving sensor platform. Data from a vertically mounted rotating laser scanner and odometry position estimates are fused and used to estimate maximum likelihood point clouds. An estimation algorithm is applied to reduce the accumulated error after a full rotation of the range finder. A configuration consisting of a SICK laser scanner mounted on a rotational actuator is described and used to evaluate the proposed approach. The data sets analyzed suggest a significant improvement in point cloud consistency, even over a short travel distance.

  • 34.
    Strezhneva, Evgenia
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Trust in IT security - the case of the British National Health System2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 35.
    Susha, Iryna
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    A Delphi study of contemporary challenges to electronic voting2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 36.
    Triebig, Cornelia
    et al.
    Unversity of Würzburg.
    Klügl, Franziska
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Elements of a documentation framework for agent-based simulation models2009In: Cybernetics and systems, ISSN 0196-9722, E-ISSN 1087-6553, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 441-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sufficient and appropriate documentation of a simulation model forms an essential prerequisite for quality assessment as well as for activities of maintenance, reuse or reproduction of the model and its results. This is true for every simulation paradigm. However, in particular for agent-based simulations with their high degree of freedom in design, their usually complex behavior and interactions, high level of detail and heterogeneity, etc, documentation becomes indispensable, but also problematic.

    This paper contributes to general advancement of the methodological basis of agent-based simulations by presenting a structured way of documenting agent-based simulation models. We propose a documentation framework that consists of six different categories of model information: metadata, informal model characterization, model contents, expected simulation behavior, experimental frame and passed tests.

     

  • 37.
    Tuayev, Maksud
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Enhancing citizen engagement through information technology: A case study of National Health Service Connecting for Health (NHSCFH), UK2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 38.
    Wang, Hao
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Xie, Yun
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    The use of Online Social Networks in Chinese Collaborative E-learning Education2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 39.
    Wondie, Binyam Lewoyehu
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Prospect of employing e-voting scheme in Ethiopia: understanding perception of the government and opposition political parties2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Over the years, the opposition parties argued that the existing election system in Ethiopia has many problems during the election process and the outcome of actual results and it is not a kind of election system they can trust.  Whereas the government officials claimed it was fair and free election system. The integrity of the election process is fundamental to the integrity of democracy itself. Hence, electronic voting (e-Voting) is a newly popular method to cast ballots of an election using electronic devices. This scheme is deployed highly as a main election system in some countries and still others are using a hybrid system. However, there are countries like Ethiopia which adopt the manual election scheme for several years till now. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to understand the perception of the government and opposition political parties towards the prospect of implementing e-voting scheme in the present context of Ethiopia.

     

    Even though there are setbacks in implementing e-voting in the present political situation of Ethiopia. However, the benefits are deemed to be much useful. Therefore, it is in the hands of the public and the government to work in developing and adopting e-voting scheme in a way that is helpful for both stakeholders. This paper suggests the government and the oppositions should have a reasonable consensus and planned date for starting the campaign which gives the right for the people for free and fair election and the rise of new political arena.

     

    Key words- e-voting, hybrid system, manual election scheme

     

     

     

  • 40.
    Åstrand, Björn
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Rögnvaldsson, Thorsteinn
    Halmstad University.
    Bouguerra, Abdelbaki
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Andreasson, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    An Autonomous Robotic System for Load Transportation2009In: Proceedings of the 4th Swedish Workshop on Autonomous Robotics (SWAR), 2009, p. 56-57Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 40 of 40
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